Back to Top

 

Welcome to The Elms Party website.

Barbara Borsack
Candidate for Mayor

Richard Lawler
Candidate of Trustee

Ray Harden
Candidate for Trustee

 

Village Election
Tuesday - June 16, 2020 - Noon to 9pm

 

News

Sunday, December 8, 2019 9:24 AM

Annual Santa Parade

Trustees Rose Brown, Rick Lawler, Tiger Graham, and Barbara Borsack participated in the Santa Parade on Main Street yesterday.






Thursday, November 28, 2019 7:28 AM

East Hampton Star Article

East Hampton Village Has Big
Plans for Centennial Celebration


A Fourth of July parade in East Hampton Village in 1921

By Star Staff
November 27, 2019
To mark the 100th anniversary of the incorporation of East Hampton Village, there will be a series of events in 2020, beginning in January with the unveiling of a new village seal and culminating with a centennial parade and other festivities on Sept. 26.
In August 2018, Mayor Paul F. Rickenbach Jr. appointed Barbara Borsack as chairwoman of the centennial celebration committee. At the time, Mr. Rickenbach recounted the history of the village’s formation. On Sept. 25, 1920, he said, residents had voted, by a margin of 166 to 57, to break away from East Hampton Town. “Needless to say, we have all reaped the benefits of this vote,” the mayor said.
The centennial committee includes Rose Brown, a member of the village board, and representatives from the East Hampton Clericus, the Hamptons International Film Festival, the East Hampton School District, the Ladies Village Improvement Society, the East Hampton Library, the Garden Club of East Hampton, and the Village Preservation Society, among others. Ms. Borsack has enlisted Bess Rattray, the editor of The Star’s East magazine, to organize the parade day events.
Over the past year, Ms. Borsack said, committee members have been coming up with ways to celebrate the occasion. Plans are still being firmed up, but as of now, she said, presentations on the history of the village and the town will be held, schools will incorporate lessons about the 1920s into their curriculums, and a time capsule will be buried. “It will be a yearlong community event,” she said.
To kick things off, a new village seal that acknowledges the centennial will be unveiled at the first board meeting of the new year. It was designed by Scott Bluedorn, a local mixed-media artist. “It’s very pretty,” said Ms. Borsack. “I’m excited to show it off.”
On Parade Day, Main Street will be closed to traffic, as it was in 1998 during the celebration of East Hampton Town’s 350th anniversary. “I remember thinking [the closure] was a once-in-a-lifetime thing,” said Ms. Borsack. “Now I’m happy we’re going to have a second opportunity.”
“There’s something so thrilling about being able to walk down the middle of Main Street,” said Ms. Rattray. The parade, she said, will be held in the morning. There will be about 20 1920s-theme floats, and Hugh King, the village’s historic-site manager, will be perched on a reviewing stand, announcing the floats as they go by.
Ms. Brown thought up the theme for one of them: a replica of Village Hall with the members of the board on board. James McMullen, an architect and the chairman of the Design Review Board, has agreed to design it, she said, and Ray Harden, the co-owner of Krupinski Building and the vice chairman of the Zoning Board of Appeals, will construct it. “It’s amazing to have so many talented people donating their time and effort,” Ms. Brown said.
In addition to the floats, there will be musical performances by Dixieland bands, and the handbell choir from the East Hampton Presbyterian Church. A team from the Dance Hampton studio will perform a ’20s-era dance.
Food vendors will be stationed along Main Street. Ms. Brown said that Harbor Bistro, Dreesen’s, and Homeslice Pizza are a few who will be on hand. And village restaurants plan to offer $19.20 specials.
The L.V.I.S. will provide tea service and jazz, and movies from the Roaring Twenties starring actors such as Buster Keaton and Charlie Chaplin will be shown at Guild Hall. LTV, the public-access broadcaster, has been tasked with finding vintage footage of village people and places.
There will be tours of historical village houses and gardens, and, to get Main Street storeowners into the spirit of the occasion, Ms. Borsack and Ms. Brown plan to introduce a resolution that would permit them to decorate their businesses in red, white, and blue bunting on the day of the event (also on Memorial Day, the Fourth of July, and Labor Day).
To cap off the day, there will be a baseball game at Herrick Park, which will include the singing of the national anthem, as well as performances by the East Hampton High School acappella group and other musicians.
Anyone interested in entering a float in the parade or volunteering in any other way have been asked to email EHVcentennial@easthamptonvillage.org.

 

 


Sunday, November 24, 2019 11:22 AM

Letter to editor East Hampton Star

Lawsuit Dismissals
East Hampton
November 12, 2019

Dear Editor,
I am writing to give you some background on some recent disturbing events regarding the upcoming village election.
As stated in my letter to the editor of two weeks ago, Mr. Larsen and the village parted ways at the end of 2016. I will not get into the reasons for that here. I simply want to make it clear that what has happened since then goes beyond the bounds of what some would think is customarily part of a normal village election campaign.

As was reported in The Star, Mr. Larsen sued the village shortly after his separation, and in that suit alleged things about me that he knew were blatantly false. Why he targeted me in particular is anybody’s guess. I believe I know the reasons for it, but I will not speculate here. Fortunately, the lawsuit was dismissed, but not before great cost to the village taxpayer. To demonstrate the frivolousness of his suit, he proceeded to sue the village a second time, for not supplying him with requested information under the Freedom of Information Act for his first lawsuit. Curiously, he filed the second lawsuit even before the allotted time frame for supplying the originally requested information had elapsed. That suit also was dismissed, but, again, not before costing the village taxpayer thousands of dollars.

I mention the initial lawsuits as the precursor for what was to come. After the lawsuit dismissals, Mr. Larsen began a campaign of continuing FOIA requests to the village in the hopes of finding something that the village board, and in particular me, had done that could be construed as illegal or unethical.

In all, he has requested information from the village a total of at least 12 times since his separation. The bulk of those have been since he began his campaign for mayor. Most can be considered legitimate inquiries, with some exceptions. He always makes them very general in nature, and in many cases he singles me out when requesting information. This suggests that he is on a fishing expedition, rather than a legitimate effort to support a belief that he may uncover some wrongdoing. His requests range from his original lawsuit, having no merit, to the very mundane request for the Fire Department gym records. What information he hopes to glean from gym records one can only imagine. Again, these requests require a great deal of manpower and expense in order to fill. One such request took 30 employee hours to complete. He knows that if the village should innocently miss supplying him with just one piece of paper that pertains to his request, he could then sue us for not completely filling that request.

Most recently, his FOIA requests have taken on a more personal and perhaps sinister nature. In the last month, he has requested all information that the village has on two properties that I am associated with in the village, including my personal residence. I am not concerned with what is in those records. My concern is that he is using the guise of his campaign to intimidate me from exposing pertinent information about him.

My concerns are supported by the fact that his latest FOIA request for my personal residence records occurred early Friday morning, Nov. 8, the day after my letter exposing his unethical issues appeared in your paper. To me, that is a clear effort to intimidate, since those records have nothing to do with the issues most important to village residents.
The other curious thing about all of this is that I am not even running against Mr. Larsen for mayor in this election.

Therefore, there is no other reason for him to target me other than for personal reasons.Sadly, Mr. Larsen has opened the door to this unnecessary dialogue, and it is my sincere hope that moving forward we can all concentrate on those issues that will affect village residents in the future. Our continued existence as one of the “most beautiful villages” you will find anywhere is at stake.

Sincerely,
RICK LAWLER



Sunday, November 24, 2019 9:25 AM

Letter to editor East Hampton Star

Tired of It
East Hampton
November 18, 2019
Dear David,
I am not one to write letters to The Star but after the constant articles on and letters from Jerry Larsen, I now feel compelled. Quite frankly, I, and many others, are tired of it and are more concerned in the affairs of this beautiful village. It is a shame how personal this has become for him, and none of this has to do with the issues, so I am going to be as quick and precise as possible.

It is a well-known fact that Mr. Larsen is renting a one-bedroom apartment in the Village of East Hampton. It is also very well known that he is not living there. Therefore, he is not paying village taxes — the village that he cares so much about.

Another fact is that apparently, his contract was not renewed as chief of police. While he received some awards and recognition, it is obvious that he abused his powers and responsibilities while being the chief.

My question would be: What were those abuses?
I think the above says something about Mr. Larsen’s character and, quite frankly, I don’t think this is someone I would want making decisions regarding the village. Let’s stop the finger pointing and stating untruths.

I anticipate that next week Mr. Larsen will take this, twist it, turn it around, and try to defend himself, once again. That only serves for Mr. Larsen to get some self-satisfaction, nothing to do with his vision for this village, which makes me wonder what his real motives are.

I urge him to stick to the issues of the village and stay away from any further mud slinging. Enough is enough! Move on!

Respectfully yours,
VERONICA STROEBEL


Friday, November 8, 2019 8:02 AM

Letter to editor East Hampton Star

November 4, 2019
Dear Editor,
In response to recent statements that appeared in the local press regarding Mayor Rickenbach’s opinions about transition plans upon his retirement in December, we would like to make the following clear to the public:

We respect the mayor’s decision to announce his impending retirement in December, and we believe that any decision regarding how best to transition from the mayor’s retirement to the June election should be made openly and transparently.

There is no vacancy at this point and the mayor has indicated he won’t retire until Dec. 31. Should the mayor formally retire in December as he has indicated, we believe the board should have a public discussion at a public meeting before deciding on how best to facilitate the transition.

The most important thing in our opinion is for the village to be efficiently and effectively managed during the transition period until the next mayor is elected in June and installed on July 1.

Jerry Larsen’s false allegation that the village board is being unethical by simply following New York State law after Mayor Rickenbach leaves office at the end of this year is offensive. The law provides that the deputy mayor shall assume the responsibility in the absence of the board appointing a mayor until the next election.

Mr. Larsen’s unethical assertion is unfortunately typical of his self-serving propensities, since it was his own lack of ethics and abuse of authority for his own personal gain during his tenure as village chief of police that precipitated the unanimous decision of the village board to refuse to renew his employment contract with the village in 2016.

Sincerely yours,
RICK LAWLER
Deputy Mayor

BARBARA BORSACK
Village Trustee


The Elms Party
Powered by CampaignPartner.com - Political Websites