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Thursday, September 10, 2020 7:48 AM

𝗘𝗛𝗊𝘁𝗮𝗿 & 𝗘𝗛𝗣𝗿𝗲𝘀𝘀 𝗘𝗡𝗗𝗢𝗥𝗊𝗘 𝗕𝗮𝗿𝗯𝗮𝗿𝗮 𝗕𝗌𝗿𝘀𝗮𝗰𝗞

 
 

"Ms. Borsack is a steady, capable hand who deserves the chance to lead." (EHPress)


"Quality of life and the environment are among her priorities. She projects calm and is respectful of others. These qualities would serve the village well with her in the mayor’s chair. She gets our vote." (EHStar)

 


Tuesday, September 8, 2020 4:43 PM

𝗔𝗯𝘀𝗲𝗻𝘁𝗲𝗲 𝗕𝗮𝗹𝗹𝗌𝘁 𝗜𝗻𝗳𝗌𝗿𝗺𝗮𝘁𝗶𝗌𝗻

Voter Information:

Applications for absentee ballots for the Village election on September 15th are available at Village Hall through September 14th.  The application can be filled out and returned on the spot at Village Hall and receive your ballot.

Village Hall is open Monday - Friday / 9am to 4pm / 631.324.4150

 


Saturday, September 5, 2020 8:37 AM

𝗙𝗮𝗰𝗲𝗯𝗌𝗌𝗞 𝗖𝗌𝗺𝗺𝗲𝗻𝘁𝘀 𝗥𝗘 𝗘𝗛𝗊𝘁𝗮𝗿 𝗘𝗻𝗱𝗌𝗿𝘀𝗲𝗺𝗲𝗻𝘁 𝗌𝗳 𝗕𝗮𝗿𝗯𝗮𝗿𝗮 𝗕𝗌𝗿𝘀𝗮𝗰𝗞 𝗳𝗌𝗿 𝗠𝗮𝘆𝗌𝗿

 

As a longtime village board member, Barbara Borsack has distinguished herself as a leader able to moderate conflicting factions. She is a 30-year member and former chief of the Village Ambulance Association, active in her church, and has roots in East Hampton that go back to its founding in the 1600s. She would be the village’s first female mayor, but more amazingly, she was the first woman ever elected as a village trustee. Quality of life and the environment are among her priorities. She projects calm and is respectful of others. These qualities would serve the village well with her in the mayor’s chair. She gets our vote.


Friday, September 4, 2020 7:58 AM

𝗢𝘂𝗿 𝗘𝗻𝘁𝗶𝗿𝗲 𝗟𝗶𝘃𝗲𝘀 / 𝗘𝗛𝗊𝘁𝗮𝗿 / 𝗟𝗲𝘁𝘁𝗲𝗿 𝘁𝗌 𝗘𝗱𝗶𝘁𝗌𝗿

Our Entire Lives

Letter to Editor / EHStar / Sept 3

All of us who live here and love this village make a choice to be here and have a sizable investment in our homes. Some candidates running for office in this election have said, “East Hampton should be more like Sag Harbor or Montauk.” However, we embrace our distinctions, and we believe village residents choose East Hampton because of the peaceful enjoyment of our homes, the quiet nights, and the beautiful scenery, the world’s best beaches and open spaces, and gorgeous homes, large and small.

We believe that this is one of the most desirable places to live in the country. Rick Lawler, Ray Harden, and I have worked hard to balance the costs of keeping our infrastructure strong and secure while at the same time achieving an Aa1 credit rating. It has taken years of careful planning and commitment to preserve our scenic vistas, beautiful historic properties, open space, and the unique village greens. Iconic places like Hook Mill, the North and South End Cemeteries, the Sheep Fold, Town Pond, and Herrick Park make this a unique and special place. Because we recognize the importance of these properties to the character of the village, we have dedicated our support to continuing that effort by preserving the Gardiner lot and windmill, the Dayton farm, land adjacent to Herrick Park, and the Dominy shops and homestead, just to name a few. These are some of the unique properties that define the character of this village.

During the course of this campaign some candidates have proposed changes for the village that would dangerously change the village in ways we do not believe in or think village residents want. Such proposals have included an expansion of music venues, ongoing street fairs, commercial expansion into residential neighborhoods, and paid parking.

We love East Hampton because we live here. We’ve all lived here our entire lives, welcoming each new resident to enjoy it with us. We are East Hampton Village, and we hope you’ll vote Row C on Sept. 15.

Sincerely,

BARBARA BORSACK
Candidate for mayor

RICK LAWLER
Candidate for trustee

RAY HARDEN
Candidate for trustee


Friday, September 4, 2020 7:48 AM

𝗘𝗮𝘀𝘁 𝗛𝗮𝗺𝗜𝘁𝗌𝗻 𝗊𝘁𝗮𝗿 𝗘𝗻𝗱𝗌𝗿𝘀𝗲𝘀 𝗕𝗮𝗿𝗯𝗮𝗿𝗮 𝗕𝗌𝗿𝘀𝗮𝗰𝗞 𝗳𝗌𝗿 𝗠𝗮𝘆𝗌𝗿

For East Hampton Village mayor, one thing is certain: Jerry Larsen is the wrong choice. However, in a three-way race an alternative outcome is not assured. What will be essential is that voters generally satisfied with the way the village is run coalesce around one of the remaining candidates. We believe Deputy Mayor Barbara Borsack should be the one, no matter how much you might like Arthur Graham, the third candidate.

The Jerry Larsen show would be a serious setback for the village. From the start, his candidacy was peculiar, funded by a deep-pocketed donor and drawing support from business owners and landlords unhappy with the village’s restrictions on expansion. His backers in the Police Department, which he once led as chief, are but a handful in the Police Benevolent Association, which also has endorsed the Trump apologist Lee Zeldin in his re-election effort.

Mr. Larsen and his wife, Lisa Mulhern-Larsen, sued the village after his retirement, saying it had improperly blocked their side gig, a private security firm, in an attempt to reduce competition for similar services offered by then-Mayor Paul F. Rickenbach Jr. and Richard Lawler, who was then a trustee and now is mayor. The suit was dismissed in 2018 by a federal judge because Mr. Larsen had waited too long to file it. Once the matter was ended, former Mayor Rickenbach minced few words, saying Mr. Larsen was a “disgruntled and litigious former employee,” and that he hoped Mr. Larsen would “finally discontinue his spiteful actions against the village.” The 2018 proceeding was not Mr. Larsen’s only personal involvement with the courts. Earlier, he had been named in a messy lawsuit involving a relationship he had with the then-wife of an East Hampton Town police officer. Wherever Mr. Larsen goes, drama follows and East Hampton Village voters should steer clear.

The Larsens have had an eye on public office for a long time. First, Ms. Mulhern-Larsen unsuccessfully ran for East Hampton Town Board in 2015 with Republican backing. Then, Mr. Larsen took a crack at it two years later, also as a Republican, but came in last when the votes were counted. He announced his intention to run for village mayor early in 2019, just about the time he rented an apartment on Newtown Lane to qualify; the Larsens’ family home being well outside the village, in Northwest Woods. His candidacy has been marred by anonymous mystery letters and allegations that he has improperly encouraged part-time residents to vote by absentee ballot. His campaign also accepted individual donations in excess of the legal limit in five very obvious examples.

Mr. Larsen has run an active campaign and drawn some support, although a lot of it is from people who are not village residents. Though he has made good policy suggestions, his core campaign promise has been easing rules for business and property owners frustrated by village regulations. This kind of overturning of long-fought local laws and policies should be rejected by voters, that is, those who actually live within village bounds. If he could find enough allies among the village trustees, he would wreak long-term havoc.

Mr. Graham’s bid for mayor came, ostensibly, because he feared a win by Mr. Larsen. From the start, this has seemed an implausible justification for what was really his own ambition — why not let Ms. Borsack take Mr. Larsen on alone and not muddy the waters? He may have calculated that he could squeak out a victory by falling somewhere between Mr. Larsen and Ms. Borsack; indeed that is exactly how his Fish Hooks Party has framed the campaign. During a debate among the candidates, Mr. Graham did not impress. On social media, he has appeared skeptical of climate science and to share at least some views with President Trump. He has been a perfectly fine board member, but that does not necessarily mean he is the best choice for the top post.

As a longtime village board member, Barbara Borsack has distinguished herself as a leader able to moderate conflicting factions. She is a 30-year member and former chief of the Village Ambulance Association, active in her church, and has roots in East Hampton that go back to its founding in the 1600s. She would be the village’s first female mayor, but more amazingly, she was the first woman ever elected as a village trustee. Quality of life and the environment are among her priorities. She projects calm and is respectful of others. These qualities would serve the village well with her in the mayor’s chair. She gets our vote.


Tuesday, September 1, 2020 5:19 PM

𝗧𝗿𝘂𝘀𝘁𝗲𝗲 𝗗𝗲𝗯𝗮𝘁𝗲

𝗥𝗶𝗰𝗞 𝗟𝗮𝘄𝗹𝗲𝗿 & 𝗥𝗮𝘆 𝗛𝗮𝗿𝗱𝗲𝗻 were in a debate last night with the other candidates for Village Trustee. We think they did a great job.

 


Monday, August 31, 2020 7:33 AM

𝗘𝗱𝗶𝘁𝗌𝗿𝗶𝗮𝗹 / 𝗘𝗛𝗊𝘁𝗮𝗿 / 𝗔 𝗠𝘂𝘀𝘁 𝗥𝗲𝗮𝗱


Scanning the Village Candidates

 

Editorial

August 27, 2020

Voting by absentee ballot has already begun in a rare, contested East Hampton Village Board election. And in the last weeks of a very long campaign, village voters will be paying close attention. Here’s what they might look for.

Among the three candidates for mayor, the choices are a continuation of the current, measured approach with Barbara Borsack, change, but not too much, with Tiger Graham, and a free-for-all of more and different commercial uses in the village with Jerry Larsen, or something like that.

Despite two years of campaigning, it is still difficult to figure out just why Mr. Larsen, who rented an apartment above Mary’s Marvelous on Newtown Lane in order to qualify to run for office, wants the post so badly, and it is impossible to overlook the fact that he remains an employee of the village’s largest taxpayer, the billionaire dealmaker Ronald Perelman. Not long ago, Mr. Perelman settled a protracted battle with the village after he was caught with numerous structures without permits and clearing too much land at his Creeks estate on Georgica Pond.

Mr. Larsen as mayor is out of the question. He says he is running against the “village of ‘no’ “; we believe a majority of residents think “no” is the right answer to relentless development and looming commercialization of business district-edge properties. Note, too, that his campaign manager is  associated with the Hedges Inn, which has battled the village in an effort to host more weddings and outdoor events over opposition from neighbors. Village voters should see a theme here.

The election is Sept. 15. There is still time for properly registered residents to choose between Ms. Borsack and Mr. Graham for mayor. We will have more to say on this next week. As to the candidates for trustee, there are plenty. Ray Harden and Rick Lawler are incumbents, albeit that Mr. Harden was appointed to the post earlier this year after Mayor Paul F. Rickenbach stepped down. They, along with Ms. Borsack, are running as the Elms Party.

Mr. Graham and David Driscoll, a retired New York City police inspector, make up the Fish Hooks Party. Mr. Larsen’s NewTown Party running mates are Chris Minardi, who is a member of the village zoning board, and Sandra Melendez, a young lawyer. Mr. Lawler, the current mayor and another ex-cop, would return as a trustee.

Among the new  trustee hopefuls, only Mr. Driscoll has appeared publicly to show much interest in winning, and to have actually studied village issues; the others look all but indifferent or haven’t been heard from at all. There is still time to correct that. They are compelling candidates, but need in this last period before the ballots are due to step up, speak out, and make cases for themselves.

 

 


Sunday, August 30, 2020 8:31 AM

𝗞𝗲𝗲𝗜 𝗧𝗵𝗲 𝗩𝗶𝗹𝗹𝗮𝗎𝗲 𝗔 𝗕𝗲𝗮𝘂𝘁𝗶𝗳𝘂𝗹 𝗣𝗹𝗮𝗰𝗲 𝗧𝗌 𝗟𝗶𝘃𝗲


Friday, August 28, 2020 7:55 AM

𝗘𝗹𝗺𝘀 𝗣𝗮𝗿𝘁𝘆 / 𝗟𝗲𝘁𝘁𝗲𝗿 𝘁𝗌 𝗘𝗱𝗶𝘁𝗌𝗿 / 𝗘𝗛𝗊𝘁𝗮𝗿

Worked Hard
Letter to Editor
Aug 27th edition

Dear Editor:

The upcoming election on Sept. 15 in East Hampton Village is going to be a pivotal one in this village’s history. The future of the village is very fragile, and a good deal of permanent damage can be done under the wrong leadership. Inn owners want to expand and create live music venues to rival Montauk. Retailers complain that they want to be another Sag Harbor, with busy sidewalks of tourists. None of the changes they want would benefit the village residents — only cause congestion, lack of parking, noise, and loss of the peace and quiet enjoyment we love. It would be impossible to go back if some things are allowed to change.

We, the candidates from the Elms Party, are all lifelong residents of East Hampton Village. We are the only party that can make that claim. We have spent our lives here, and we own businesses here. We understand the need to balance a healthy commercial core with peaceful residential neighborhoods because we live here, and have for a very long time. We want our own businesses to thrive, but not at the expense of the peace and quiet of the residential neighborhoods where we live.

We believe that the investments our residents make in their properties deserve to be protected, which is why we have worked to legislate noise ordinances, lower speed limits, and impose weight limits on our residential streets. We’ve instituted changes to our zoning code to increase setbacks and control rooflines to eliminate massing in new construction. We’ve worked to protect our historic buildings and our scenic views, and protect our groundwater and ponds. We believe in renewable energy, and have installed solar panels on our emergency services building and our public works building, as well as added electric vehicles to our fleet. We’ve worked hard to maintain a Moody’s rating of Aa1, and save our taxpayers money. We’ve added staff to supplement our volunteer emergency ambulance corps and added code-enforcement officers.

In addition, we enjoy a good working relationship with East Hampton Town, working together on projects such as our joint fuel facility, an ongoing coastal erosion study, and the new joint traffic task force. We also have nurtured relationships with county and state officials, and work closely with them when necessary.

We are East Hampton Village, and we trust that the other residents are wise enough to recognize wolves in sheep’s clothing. Our village depends on it. Please vote Row C on Election Day.

Sincerely,

The Elms Party

BARBARA BORSACK
Candidate for mayor

RICK LAWLER
Candidate for trustee

RAY HARDEN
Candidate for trustee


Thursday, August 27, 2020 9:13 AM

𝗘𝗮𝘀𝘁 𝗛𝗮𝗺𝗜𝘁𝗌𝗻 𝗣𝗿𝗲𝘀𝘀 𝗔𝗿𝘁𝗶𝗰𝗹𝗲

East Hampton Mayor Hopefuls
Trade Barbs In Debate


Click title or picture to read article


Wednesday, August 26, 2020 7:57 AM

𝗘𝗻𝗱𝗌𝗿𝘀𝗲𝗺𝗲𝗻𝘁 / 𝗟𝗮𝗿𝗿𝘆 𝗖𝗮𝗻𝘁𝘄𝗲𝗹𝗹

Barbara Borsack is the best choice for Mayor in this year’s election.
I have known Barbara for over 50 years and she is one of my best friends. Few people have her integrity and character or have given more to our community.

Barbara has a lifetime of commitment to the Village. She was the first woman elected to the Board of Trustees and has led the fight to protect and enhance our quality of life.

Barbara has the intellect and experience to be an outstanding Mayor and the first woman Mayor in the Village.

The Village was one of the first municipalities to adopt land use zoning for planning and community preservation.

Planning and preservation are what the village election is all about this year.

Barbara and her running mates Rick Lawler and Ray Harden are making a strong commitment to protect and preserve our environment, our heritage and the residential character of the village.

They will not allow the commercialization of the village and will protect it from outside interests who want to exploit its beauty for personal gain.

Please join me in electing Barbara, Rick, and Ray to the Village Board. Please vote on September 15 in person or by absentee ballot.

The future of our Village depends on you.

 
Sincerely,
Larry Cantwell


Monday, August 24, 2020 10:50 AM

𝗡𝗮𝗻𝗰𝘆 𝗔𝗻𝗱𝗿𝗲𝘄𝘀 / 𝗘𝗻𝗱𝗌𝗿𝘀𝗲𝗺𝗲𝗻𝘁


Friday, August 21, 2020 7:56 AM

𝗘𝗮𝘀𝘁 𝗛𝗮𝗺𝗜𝘁𝗌𝗻 𝗊𝘁𝗮𝗿 / 𝗔𝗿𝘁𝗶𝗰𝗹𝗲 / 𝗔𝘂𝗎 𝟮𝟬𝘁𝗵 𝗘𝗱𝗶𝘁𝗶𝗌𝗻

August 20, 2020

The three candidates running for mayor of East Hampton Village on Sept. 15 Barbara Borsack, the deputy mayor, Arthur Graham, a village trustee, and Jerry Larsen, the village's former chief of police discussed their priorities and visions for the village's future in interviews last week.

Ms. Borsack, who in 2000 became the first woman elected to the village board, is hoping to be the first to lead the village as well. As mayor, she said, she would first consider how every proposal would affect residents quality of life. "The residents have to be number one. We have to consider them first, and if it's going to make their lives miserable, then that's not what we want," she said.

Last September, Ms. Borsack and the other members of the village board voted to accept a $110,000 proposal from the Nelson, Pope, and Voorhis civil engineering firm to develop plans to revitalize the commercial district and provide it with a sewage treatment system. Without a system that can handle increased density and reduce the nitrogen that adversely affects ground and surface water, board members say they cannot safely bring in new restaurants and other businesses, nor can they provide more affordable housing by increasing the number of second-story apartments.

"I would love to see more workforce housing in second-story apartments," said Ms. Borsack. "I have kids here, I know how hard it is for them. Teachers and other young professionals need places to stay that they can afford."

While she would welcome more restaurants and coffee shops, she doesn't agree that the commercial core is in immediate need of revitalization. "We have a vital downtown, people are there all the time," she said. "But we have to look toward the future. In 10 years, where are we going to be if people continue to do their shopping online? You always have to project."

In June, after the pandemic forced restaurants to shut down, Village Mayor Richard Lawler issued an executive order letting them set up temporary outdoor dining areas, including on public property. That has allowed restaurants to recoup some lost income, but outdoor dining has not been universally embraced by residents, Ms. Borsack said. "I've had people say to me in passing, 'You know, that is not East Hampton. We don't need people sitting by the cars.' "

Ms. Borsack said the village should continue to allow outdoor dining, but only on a case-by-case basis and only on private property. "I don't think I want outdoor dining on the public right of way, that's problematic," she said.

Two years after adopting a law that prevented the village's historic inns from holding weddings and other special events outdoors, the board is thinking about relaxing the prohibition. Ms. Borsack is willing to allow the inns to hold between six and eight outdoor events per year, but "the residents that live around them would have to be protected," she said. "The inns would have to apply for a special permit so that we can control the music, and the parking, and everything outdoor would have to be over by 9 p.m."

"The inns are nonconforming uses in residential areas, which is what the Surf Lodge was in Montauk. Is that what we want?" she asked, referring to large parties with loud music. "It could very easily happen here if we're not careful."

Earlier this year, the trustees decided to install a mobile enforcement system in village-owned parking lots. The system will allow the police to read license plates and keep track of time restrictions. It will also do away with ticket dispensers, and allow the village to think about how to maximize parking. For example, Ms. Borsack said, "We can try making the outside rim of Reutershan three-hour parking, or the Schenck lot. That's the part that is so exciting, because we can try different things."

Easing traffic congestion is a challenge she welcomes. ╥If we can't get a handle on this traffic, nobody's going to want to be here," she said. She helped form a task force that includes Town Supervisor Peter Van Scoyoc, State Assemblyman Fred W. Thiele Jr., Mayor Kathleen Mulcahy of Sag Harbor, members of the planning and police departments, and residents, who are looking into alternate modes of transportation between the village and the town.

Last summer, Ms. Borsack spent a week in a Maine town that operated open-air trolleys, and she's hoping to develop a similar system here. "If I knew I could walk to the corner and get on a bus within 15 minutes that would take me to the beaches, I would consider it," she said.

Asked what sets her apart from her opponents, she said, "My style is very low-key. I love to work with people and try to problem-solve. I don't fly by the seat of my pants, I'm going to find out as much as I can about a problem, so it might look like I'm not quick to make decisions, but I don't want to be quick to make decisions. I want to know all the facts, and really get as much input as I can from residents. I believe in residents-driven decisions."


Thursday, August 20, 2020 5:49 AM

𝗗𝗘𝗕𝗔𝗧𝗘 - 𝗊𝗜𝗌𝗻𝘀𝗌𝗿𝗲𝗱 𝗯𝘆 𝗚𝗿𝗌𝘂𝗜 𝗳𝗌𝗿 𝗚𝗌𝗌𝗱 𝗚𝗌𝘃𝗲𝗿𝗻𝗺𝗲𝗻𝘁


Monday, August 17, 2020 8:51 AM

𝗔𝗻 𝗘𝗻𝗱𝗌𝗿𝘀𝗲𝗺𝗲𝗻𝘁

I have known 𝗕𝗮𝗿𝗯𝗮𝗿𝗮 𝗕𝗌𝗿𝘀𝗮𝗰𝗞 for many years. As I think about voting for the critical position of mayor of East Hampton Village, I look for a record of accomplishments and depth of experience in local government. I know Barbara well from our many years as board members of the East Hampton Historical Society, and our shared commitment to conserving the beauty and essence of East Hampton Village. I know that Barbara has what it takes to be the next mayor of the village. She has served for many years in our local government, importantly as deputy mayor. Good governmental leadership requires honesty, integrity, excellent communication skills, confidence to inspire others, resilience, and transparency. She has the vision and passion to keep this beautiful village protected.

Moreover, she has demonstrated her commitment to fiscal responsibility contributing strongly to our current Aa-1 credit rating. She is open to new ideas and essential realistic improvements. Her decision-making skills, government experience, and capabilities make her uniquely qualified to hold this office.

The alternative candidates will bring us to a different crossroads in this election.

Do we want to keep our residential community’s quality of life? Do we want a thoughtful, revitalized commercial village? We must vote to keep East Hampton the most beautiful village in America. 𝗜 𝘄𝗶𝗹𝗹 𝗰𝗮𝘀𝘁 𝗺𝘆 𝘃𝗌𝘁𝗲 𝗳𝗌𝗿 𝗕𝗮𝗿𝗯𝗮𝗿𝗮 𝗕𝗌𝗿𝘀𝗮𝗰𝗞 because of her record and my faith in her abilities and leadership to take us forward.

Maureen Bluedorn


Monday, August 17, 2020 8:18 AM

𝗘𝗹𝗲𝗰𝘁𝗶𝗌𝗻 𝗗𝗮𝘆 𝗶𝘀 𝗊𝗲𝗜𝘁𝗲𝗺𝗯𝗲𝗿 𝟭𝟱𝘁𝗵


Friday, August 14, 2020 4:07 PM

𝗧𝗵𝗲 𝗊𝘁𝗿𝗌𝗻𝗎 𝗕𝗿𝗌𝘁𝗵𝗲𝗿𝘀 𝗕𝗹𝗮𝗰𝗞𝘀𝗺𝗶𝘁𝗵 𝗊𝗵𝗌𝗜


From East Hampton Star
August 13, 2020

This photograph from the C. Frank Dayton photo collection at the East Hampton Library shows the blacksmith shop owned and operated by the Strong family here. It is believed to have been taken sometime in 1903. The shop was on Accabonac Highway and Pantigo Road.

The East Hampton Star printed this photo in its Nov. 29, 1962, issue, and named the men, left to right: John Y. Strong, James M. Strong Jr., and James M. Strong Sr.

John Hayes Youngs established the business in 1846. His son-in-law, James Madison Strong (1840-1914), who served three years in Company K of the 127th New York State Volunteer Regiment during the Civil War and was shot in the left arm, bought the shop. Youngs continued to work there to keep his mind busy in his old age.

James M. Strong Sr.'s house stood behind the shop until it was moved. After several years, he sold the business to his two sons, who continued to operate the business under the name of Strong Brothers.

The brothers ran it as a livery stable, but in May of 1916, The Star reported, it burned down overnight as a result of vengeful arson. Estimated losses amounted to $30,000. The Strongs and others in the community lost animals, carriages, and supplies. The garage was rebuilt later, with an office for a real estate business.

For some time in the 1960s, the Mark R. Buick-Pontiac Agency stood in a remodeled version of the original Strong garage. Today, the Strong Insurance Agency sits on the former site of the Strong Brothers Blacksmith Shop. Two of the Strong family account books, showing daily recordings of business activities, are part of the Long Island Collection.

______________________________

Barbara Strong Borsack's ancestors have been making the village a special community for many many years.


Friday, August 14, 2020 7:44 AM

𝗠𝗲𝗲𝘁 & 𝗚𝗿𝗲𝗲𝘁

Another wonderful "Meet & Greet" last evening hosted by two village residents.

We enjoyed meeting new friends and sharing our vision for the Village.


Thursday, August 6, 2020 11:24 AM

𝗟𝗮𝗿𝗿𝘆 𝗖𝗮𝗻𝘁𝘄𝗲𝗹𝗹 𝗘𝗻𝗱𝗌𝗿𝘀𝗺𝗲𝗻𝘁

Add your news summary here.


Saturday, August 1, 2020 6:13 PM

𝗠𝗲𝗲𝘁 & 𝗚𝗿𝗲𝗲𝘁

Many thanks to our friends on Buell Lane for a wonderful opportunity to present our experience and vision to a great group of voters last week! It’s always a treat to meet new friends and know that they share our love of East Hampton Village as well as our plans for the future here. What a great night it was!

Everyone went home with a goodie bag

Including a delicious freshly baked
Elms Party cookie


Saturday, August 1, 2020 11:38 AM

𝗢𝗜𝗲𝗻𝗶𝗻𝗎 𝗌𝗳 𝗡𝗌𝗿𝘁𝗵 𝗪𝗲𝘀𝘁 𝗪𝗌𝗌𝗱𝘀 𝗊𝘂𝗯𝗊𝘁𝗮𝘁𝗶𝗌𝗻


Saturday, August 1, 2020 9:22 AM

𝗊𝗌𝘂𝘁𝗵𝗮𝗺𝗜𝘁𝗌𝗻 𝗛𝗌𝘀𝗜𝗶𝘁𝗮𝗹 𝗚𝗣𝗗𝗔𝗧𝗘

As a member of the Southampton Hospital Board I'm incredibly proud of the way our hospital worked with their administration, staff, and our community to see this day!
We should all be grateful,
Barbara Borsack

 

Dear Friends,
We would like to invite you to join us in celebrating a very special patient who was discharged yesterday. As a result of the excellent and compassionate care provided by our medical and healthcare staff, she went home--after 120 days of fighting COVID-19.

Click here to view her emotional
and joyful send off

We are proud to report, that for the first time since March 8, 2020, your Hospital has no admitted patients confirmed with COVID-19 or under suspicion for the coronavirus.
 
We continue to test admitted patients for COVID-19 and we are preparing for the potential of a second surge. We ask that you continue to do your part by wearing masks, maintaining social distancing, and frequently washing your hands to help protect the health of all.  
 
Take good care of yourself and stay well.
 
Bob
Robert S. Chaloner
Chief Administrative Officer

Fred
Fredric I. Weinbaum, MD
Chief Medical Officer 
Chief Operating Officer

The information shared here is correct at the time of mailing however due to the fast moving landscape surrounding COVID-19 it may be evolving. Please check southampton.stonybrookmedicine.edu for updates.


Saturday, August 1, 2020 8:44 AM

𝗪𝗲 𝗕𝗲𝗹𝗶𝗲𝘃𝗲


Saturday, August 1, 2020 8:30 AM

𝗩𝗶𝗹𝗹𝗮𝗎𝗲 𝗕𝗲𝗮𝗰𝗵𝗲𝘀


Friday, July 24, 2020 12:30 PM

𝗟𝗮𝗿𝗿𝘆 𝗖𝗮𝗻𝘁𝘄𝗲𝗹𝗹 𝗘𝗻𝗱𝗌𝗿𝘀𝗲𝗺𝗲𝗻𝘁

 

Barbara Borsack is the best choice for Mayor in this year’s election.

I have known Barbara for over 50 years and she is one of my best friends. Few people have her integrity and character or have given more to our community.

Barbara has a lifetime of commitment to the Village. She was the first woman elected to the Board of Trustees and has led the fight to protect and enhance our quality of life.

Barbara has the intellect and experience to be an outstanding Mayor and the first woman Mayor in the Village.

The Village was one of the first municipalities to adopt land use zoning for planning and community preservation.

Planning and preservation are what the village election is all about this year.

Barbara and her running mates Rick Lawler and Ray Harden are making a strong commitment to protect and preserve our environment, our heritage and the residential character of the village.

They will not allow the commercialization of the village and will protect it from outside interests who want to exploit its beauty for personal gain.

Please join me in electing Barbara, Rick, and Ray to the Village Board. Please vote on September 15 in person or by absentee ballot.

The future of our Village depends on you.

 
Sincerely,
Larry Cantwell


Wednesday, July 22, 2020 1:59 PM

𝗛𝗲𝗿𝗿𝗶𝗰𝗞 𝗣𝗮𝗿𝗞 𝗚𝗜𝗱𝗮𝘁𝗲


Read Barbara Borsack's email
regarding Herrick Park


Tuesday, July 14, 2020 10:39 AM

𝗩𝗶𝗹𝗹𝗮𝗎𝗲 𝗔𝗻𝗻𝘂𝗮𝗹 𝗕𝘂𝗱𝗎𝗲𝘁


Read Barbara Borsack's email about
the Village Annual Budget


Saturday, July 11, 2020 9:55 AM

𝗪𝗵𝗮𝘁 𝗞𝗶𝗻𝗱 𝗢𝗳 𝗖𝗌𝗺𝗺𝘂𝗻𝗶𝘁𝘆 𝗔𝗿𝗲 𝗪𝗲?

 
There are topics in this Septembers’s village election that need to be examined. One that stands out to us is that our opponents are saying that East Hampton Village is a “resort community” needing to cater to tourists and day trippers.
 
We believe East Hampton Village is a community primarily of full-time and part-time residents rather than a tourist attraction. We have visitors who come for short term stays, but we feel our residents are our first priority. We want to keep East Hampton a peaceful and serene village where all homeowners can find respite on the weekends and holidays. As full time, lifelong residents ourselves, we value our homes and yards as places of refuge and relaxation.
 
That’s why the village government has laws about leaf blowers and construction noise. It’s also why we are taking a firm stand on our small country inns, as well as searching for new ways to control short term rentals in residential neighborhoods. If the inns were allowed to create spot zoning and become “hotel zones” as they have proposed, they would have the ability to do unlimited events with music and outdoor dining. We are a residential community first and foremost. We believe that short term rentals in our residential neighborhoods need to be controlled.
 
It is important for voters to examine the motives of some of our opponents in this race. Both Jerry Larsen and Chris Minardi of the Newtown Party have close real estate connections. Other candidates know very little about how hard the village has fought over the past 100 years to keep the wishes of town residents from creating a village full of nightlife and crowds. Town residents would like to see the village become a place for them to come enjoy the “party life” and then leave it all behind while they go back to their own quiet homes.  Those of us who are village residents know we already deal with more traffic and noise than we would like. It’s imperative for you to know the players in this election because the future of this village depends on it.
 
We had hoped to be visiting our residents on door-to-door walks by the first of April but sadly the present situation makes that impossible to do. We would love to speak with you in person.
 
Please check our website to send us emails and we will answer all of them. We are happy to call you as well, or set up a video conference with you and some of your friends to answer your questions. 

 


Thursday, July 9, 2020 3:30 PM

𝗧𝗵𝗲 𝗩𝗶𝗹𝗹𝗮𝗎𝗲 𝗌𝗳 𝗚𝗊


Saturday, July 4, 2020 7:49 AM

𝗛𝗮𝗜𝗜𝘆 𝟰𝘁𝗵 𝗌𝗳 𝗝𝘂𝗹𝘆


Tuesday, June 30, 2020 1:09 PM

𝗖𝗌𝗮𝘀𝘁𝗮𝗹 𝗘𝗿𝗌𝘀𝗶𝗌𝗻 𝗊𝘁𝘂𝗱𝘆

Read Barbara Borsack's most recent email


Click on Photo


Thursday, June 25, 2020 11:20 AM

𝗚𝗜𝗱𝗮𝘁𝗲 𝗌𝗻 𝗜𝗮𝗿𝗞𝗶𝗻𝗎 𝗶𝗻 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝘃𝗶𝗹𝗹𝗮𝗎𝗲

FYI from the Village Facebook page posted 06-25:

 


Tuesday, June 23, 2020 4:04 PM

𝗕𝗮𝗿𝗯𝗮𝗿𝗮 𝗕𝗌𝗿𝘀𝗮𝗰𝗞 & 𝗥𝗶𝗰𝗵𝗮𝗿𝗱 𝗟𝗮𝘄𝗹𝗲𝗿 𝗌𝗻 𝗪𝗟𝗡𝗚

𝗗𝗲𝗜𝘂𝘁𝘆 𝗠𝗮𝘆𝗌𝗿 𝗕𝗮𝗿𝗯𝗮𝗿𝗮 𝗕𝗌𝗿𝘀𝗮𝗰𝗞 & 𝗠𝗮𝘆𝗌𝗿 𝗥𝗶𝗰𝗵𝗮𝗿𝗱 𝗟𝗮𝘄𝗹𝗲𝗿 were on radio station WLNG with Gary Sapiane Tuesday-June 23rd to update the community on the COVID-19 response with Phase 3 in the Village of East Hampton


Monday, June 22, 2020 10:11 AM

𝗔 𝗟𝘂𝗌𝘁𝗲 𝗳𝗿𝗌𝗺 𝗕𝗮𝗿𝗯𝗮𝗿𝗮 𝗕𝗌𝗿𝘀𝗮𝗰𝗞


Saturday, June 20, 2020 7:58 AM

𝗔 𝗟𝘂𝗌𝘁𝗲 𝗳𝗿𝗌𝗺 𝗕𝗮𝗿𝗯𝗮𝗿𝗮 𝗕𝗌𝗿𝘀𝗮𝗰𝗞


Monday, June 15, 2020 11:31 AM

𝗣𝗵𝗮𝘀𝗲 𝟮 𝗥𝗲𝗌𝗜𝗲𝗻𝗶𝗻𝗎 𝗣𝗹𝗮𝗻𝘀

Click Picture or Text to read

Phase 2 Reopening Plans


Saturday, June 13, 2020 8:58 AM

𝗖𝗌𝗻𝗎𝗿𝗮𝘁𝘂𝗹𝗮𝘁𝗶𝗌𝗻𝘀 𝘁𝗌 𝗘𝗛𝗛𝗊 𝗖𝗹𝗮𝘀𝘀 𝗌𝗳 𝟮𝟬𝟮𝟬


Friday, June 12, 2020 7:43 AM

𝗘𝗛𝗊𝘁𝗮𝗿 𝗘𝗱𝗶𝘁𝗌𝗿𝗶𝗮𝗹 (𝟬𝟲-𝟭𝟭-𝟮𝟬)

Editorial from June 11th Edition

East Hampton Village is a lot quieter now that limits are in place for leaf blowers and other gas and diesel-powered landscape equipment. Most critically, hired landscapers must use only quieter, battery-operated leaf blowers from June 1 to a December cutoff date, except in an emergency. Fines begin at $250 and top out at $5,000 for repeat offenders.

The rules go like this: June to the second Friday in December gas and diesel-powered lawn equipment may be used only between 8 a.m. and 6 p.m., Monday through Friday, and from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday. Property owners and tenants are allowed to use gas-powered machines at home on Sundays between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m., but commercial operators may not. Already, village police have been reminding landscapers of the law and issuing warnings. 𝗪𝗲 𝘀𝗮𝘆, 𝘄𝗲𝗹𝗹 𝗱𝗌𝗻𝗲!


Thursday, June 11, 2020 12:53 PM

𝗠𝗮𝘆𝗌𝗿 𝗥𝗶𝗰𝗞 𝗟𝗮𝘄𝗹𝗲𝗿 𝗮𝗻𝗱 𝗵𝗶𝘀 𝘄𝗶𝗳𝗲 𝗠𝗮𝗱𝗲𝗹𝗶𝗻𝗲 𝗮𝘁 𝗖𝗶𝘁𝘁𝗮𝗻𝘂𝗌𝘃𝗮

𝗠𝗮𝘆𝗌𝗿 𝗥𝗶𝗰𝗞 𝗟𝗮𝘄𝗹𝗲𝗿 and his wife Madeline enjoyed their dinner at Cittanuova on Newtown Lane last night in support of the Village's new outdoor dining initiative.

 


Wednesday, June 10, 2020 12:37 PM

𝗕𝗮𝗿𝗯𝗮𝗿𝗮 𝗕𝗌𝗿𝘀𝗮𝗰𝗞 & 𝗥𝗶𝗰𝗵𝗮𝗿𝗱 𝗟𝗮𝘄𝗹𝗲𝗿 𝗌𝗻 𝗪𝗟𝗡𝗚

𝗗𝗲𝗜𝘂𝘁𝘆 𝗠𝗮𝘆𝗌𝗿 𝗕𝗮𝗿𝗯𝗮𝗿𝗮 𝗕𝗌𝗿𝘀𝗮𝗰𝗞 & 𝗠𝗮𝘆𝗌𝗿 𝗥𝗶𝗰𝗵𝗮𝗿𝗱 𝗟𝗮𝘄𝗹𝗲𝗿 were on radio station WLNG with Gary Sapiane Tuesday June 9th to update the community on the COVID-19 response with Phase II in the Village of East Hampton.


Tuesday, June 9, 2020 12:09 PM

𝗠𝗌𝗌𝗱𝘆'𝘀 𝗥𝗮𝘁𝗲𝘀 𝗘𝗛 𝗩𝗶𝗹𝗹𝗮𝗎𝗲

Click to Read


Saturday, June 6, 2020 4:18 PM

𝗧𝗵𝗲 𝗘𝗹𝗺𝘀 𝗣𝗮𝗿𝘁𝘆 𝗩𝗶𝗱𝗲𝗌

 

The Elms Party


Tuesday, June 2, 2020 11:40 AM

𝗥𝗲𝗌𝗜𝗲𝗻𝗶𝗻𝗎 𝗢𝘂𝗿 𝗘𝗰𝗌𝗻𝗌𝗺𝘆

Letter Regarding

Reopening Our Economy


Friday, May 29, 2020 11:51 AM

𝗖𝗿𝗲𝗱𝗶𝘁 𝗖𝗮𝗿𝗱 𝗖𝗌𝗻𝘁𝗿𝗶𝗯𝘂𝘁𝗶𝗌𝗻

To make a donation to our campaign with your credit card

please click on the picture or on the link below

Credit Card Donation

 


Tuesday, May 26, 2020 11:29 AM

𝗕𝗮𝗿𝗯𝗮𝗿𝗮 𝗕𝗌𝗿𝘀𝗮𝗰𝗞 & 𝗥𝗶𝗰𝗵𝗮𝗿𝗱 𝗟𝗮𝘄𝗹𝗲𝗿 𝗌𝗻 𝗪𝗟𝗡𝗚

 

𝗗𝗲𝗜𝘂𝘁𝘆 𝗠𝗮𝘆𝗌𝗿 𝗕𝗮𝗿𝗯𝗮𝗿𝗮 𝗕𝗌𝗿𝘀𝗮𝗰𝗞 & 𝗠𝗮𝘆𝗌𝗿 𝗥𝗶𝗰𝗵𝗮𝗿𝗱 𝗟𝗮𝘄𝗹𝗲𝗿 were on radio station WLNG with Gary Sapiane this morning, May 21st, to update the community on the COVID-19 response in the Village of East Hampton.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Monday, May 25, 2020 10:33 AM

𝗕𝗮𝗿𝗯𝗮𝗿𝗮 & 𝗥𝗶𝗰𝗞 𝗌𝗻 𝗪𝗣𝗣𝗕 𝗥𝗮𝗱𝗶𝗌

 

Barbara Borsack & Rick Lawler were interviewed on WPPB Southampton this morning by Gianna Volpe on her "Heart of the East End" program on Memorial Day to update the Village of East Hampton on their continued response to the COVID-19 crisis.


Sunday, May 24, 2020 8:20 AM

𝗠𝗲𝗺𝗌𝗿𝗶𝗮𝗹 𝗗𝗮𝘆


Friday, May 22, 2020 12:29 PM

𝗟𝗲𝘁𝘁𝗲𝗿 𝘁𝗌 𝗢𝘂𝗿 𝗖𝗌𝗺𝗺𝘂𝗻𝗶𝘁𝘆 / 𝗊𝗌𝘂𝘁𝗵𝗮𝗺𝗜𝘁𝗌𝗻 𝗛𝗌𝘀𝗜𝗶𝘁𝗮𝗹

A Letter to Our Community


Friday, May 22, 2020 8:14 AM

𝗟𝗲𝘁𝘁𝗲𝗿 𝘁𝗌 𝗘𝗱𝗶𝘁𝗌𝗿 𝗘𝗛𝗊𝘁𝗮𝗿

Good Person
May 21st Edition

To the Editor:

I have known Barbara Borsack a long time. She is a good person to hold the position of mayor of East Hampton Village.

When she was chief of the ambulance, she did the best. If ever there was a problem, she took care of it right away. I know she will do an excellent job as mayor.

I am very proud of her. She will make us all proud of her.

RALPH GEORGE


Thursday, May 21, 2020 3:22 PM

Memorial Day Challenge


Wednesday, May 20, 2020 10:34 AM

𝗝𝗌𝗶𝗻 𝗧𝗵𝗲 𝗘𝗹𝗺𝘀 𝗣𝗮𝗿𝘁𝘆 𝗘𝗺𝗮𝗶𝗹 𝗟𝗶𝘀𝘁

Click to Add Your Email


Wednesday, May 20, 2020 8:27 AM

𝗘𝗮𝘀𝘁 𝗛𝗮𝗺𝗜𝘁𝗌𝗻 𝗧𝗲𝘀𝘁𝗶𝗻𝗎 𝗊𝗶𝘁𝗲

On Friday morning, May 15, at the Pantigo Place ball field parking lot, the East Hampton’s COVID-19 testing site opened for business. Over 60 people were tested on the first day.

On site was East Hampton Town Supervisor Peter Van Scoyoc, East Hampton Village Deputy Mayor Barbara Borsack, and Sheila Rogers, director of the East Hampton Healthcare Foundation.

The drive-up testing facility will be open on Wednesdays and Fridays, and operated by Hudson River Health Care.

The Independent Article


Tuesday, May 19, 2020 8:28 AM

𝗧𝗵𝗲 𝗩𝗶𝗹𝗹𝗮𝗎𝗲 𝗖𝗌𝗺𝗜𝗿𝗲𝗵𝗲𝗻𝘀𝗶𝘃𝗲 𝗣𝗹𝗮𝗻

Email RE: Comprehensive Plan

Video RE: Comprehensive Plan


Friday, May 15, 2020 8:22 AM

𝗟𝗲𝘁𝘁𝗲𝗿 𝗌𝗳 𝗘𝗻𝗱𝗌𝗿𝘀𝗺𝗲𝗻𝘁 𝗘𝗛𝗊𝘁𝗮𝗿

Roots Run Deep
Letter to Editor
May 14th Edition

Dear David:
Our family has known Barbara Strong Borsack for over 30 years. Her tireless devotion and commitment to our village have been relentless. Barbara’s many accomplishments and achievements while serving on the Village Board have both benefited the village and preserved its history, charm, and beauty.

Barbara has also been an important leader and member of the board of the East Hampton Historical Society, helping to preserve and share the important heritage of our town. Barbara’s local roots run deep, as her family has been here for many generations. This continues today with grandchildren in our East Hampton schools.

Barbara has been at the forefront of bringing Covid-19 testing to East Hampton, working with Town Supervisor Peter Van Scoyoc.

Barbara would be a highly qualified mayor with decades of relevant experience. She listens to both sides sincerely, with the quality of life and the preservation of the village as her goal. That is why we are endorsing Barbara Strong Borsack for mayor of East Hampton.

Sincerely,
PAM and JOHN CATALETTO


Tuesday, May 12, 2020 4:21 PM

𝗕𝗮𝗿𝗯𝗮𝗿𝗮 𝗕𝗌𝗿𝘀𝗮𝗰𝗞 & 𝗥𝗶𝗰𝗵𝗮𝗿𝗱 𝗟𝗮𝘄𝗹𝗲𝗿 𝗌𝗻 𝗪𝗟𝗡𝗚

𝗗𝗲𝗜𝘂𝘁𝘆 𝗠𝗮𝘆𝗌𝗿 𝗕𝗮𝗿𝗯𝗮𝗿𝗮 𝗕𝗌𝗿𝘀𝗮𝗰𝗞 & 𝗠𝗮𝘆𝗌𝗿 𝗥𝗶𝗰𝗵𝗮𝗿𝗱 𝗟𝗮𝘄𝗹𝗲𝗿 were on radio station WLNG with Gary Sapiane this morning to update the community on the COVID-19 response in the Village of East Hampton.


Tuesday, May 12, 2020 8:00 AM

𝐀𝐧 𝐈𝐊𝐩𝐚𝐫𝐭𝐚𝐧𝐭 𝐌𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐚𝐠𝐞 𝐅𝐫𝐚𝐊 𝐁𝐚𝐫𝐛𝐚𝐫𝐚

An Important Message from Barbara

Click on above to read
the message from Barbara


Monday, May 11, 2020 11:29 AM

𝗕𝗮𝗿𝗯𝗮𝗿𝗮 & 𝗥𝗶𝗰𝗞 𝗌𝗻 𝗪𝗣𝗣𝗕 𝗥𝗮𝗱𝗶𝗌

 

Barbara Borsack & Rick Lawler were interviewed on WPPB Southampton this morning by Gianna Volpe on her "Heart of the East End" program to update the Village of East Hampton on their continued response to the COVID-19 crisis.  May 11, 2020


Saturday, May 9, 2020 8:01 AM

𝐄𝐚𝐬𝐭 𝐇𝐚𝐊𝐩𝐭𝐚𝐧 𝐖𝐢𝐥𝐥 𝐎𝐟𝐟𝐞𝐫 𝐂𝐎𝐕𝐈𝐃-𝟏𝟗 𝐓𝐞𝐬𝐭𝐬

𝐄𝐚𝐬𝐭 𝐇𝐚𝐊𝐩𝐭𝐚𝐧 𝐖𝐢𝐥𝐥 𝐎𝐟𝐟𝐞𝐫 𝐂𝐎𝐕𝐈𝐃-𝟏𝟗 𝐓𝐞𝐬𝐭𝐬

Click To Read Press Release


Friday, May 8, 2020 10:01 AM

𝗕𝗮𝗿𝗯𝗮𝗿𝗮 𝗕𝗌𝗿𝘀𝗮𝗰𝗞 & 𝗥𝗶𝗰𝗵𝗮𝗿𝗱 𝗟𝗮𝘄𝗹𝗲𝗿 𝗌𝗻 𝗪𝗟𝗡𝗚

𝗗𝗲𝗜𝘂𝘁𝘆 𝗠𝗮𝘆𝗌𝗿 𝗕𝗮𝗿𝗯𝗮𝗿𝗮 𝗕𝗌𝗿𝘀𝗮𝗰𝗞 & 𝗠𝗮𝘆𝗌𝗿 𝗥𝗶𝗰𝗵𝗮𝗿𝗱 𝗟𝗮𝘄𝗹𝗲𝗿 were on radio station WLNG with Gary Sapiane, Thurs 05-07, to update the community on the COVID-19 response in the Village of East Hampton.

 


Friday, May 8, 2020 8:11 AM

𝐄𝐥𝐊𝐬 𝐏𝐚𝐫𝐭𝐲 - 𝐋𝐞𝐭𝐭𝐞𝐫 𝐭𝐚 𝐄𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐚𝐫 - 𝐄𝐇𝐒𝐭𝐚𝐫

The Elms Party
Letter to Editor
EHStar / May 7th Edition

 

 

First Priority

Dear Editor:

There are topics in this June’s village election that need to be examined. One that stands out to us is that our opponents are saying that East Hampton Village is a “resort community” needing to cater to tourists and day-trippers.

We believe East Hampton Village is a community primarily of full-time and part-time residents rather than a tourist attraction. We have visitors who come for short-term stays, but we feel our residents are our first priority. We want to keep East Hampton a peaceful and serene village where all homeowners can find respite on the weekends and holidays. As full-time, lifelong residents ourselves, we value our homes and yards as places of refuge and relaxation.

That’s why the village government has laws about leaf blowers and construction noise. It’s also why we are taking a firm stand on our small country inns, as well as searching for new ways to control short-term rentals in residential neighborhoods. If the inns were allowed to create spot zoning and become “hotel zones,” as they have proposed, they would have the ability to do unlimited events with music and outdoor dining. We are a residential community first and foremost. We believe that short-term rentals in our residential neighborhoods need to be controlled.

It is important for voters to examine the motives of some of our opponents in this race. Some candidates have close ties to real estate interests. Others know very little about how hard the village has fought over the past 100 years to keep the wishes of town residents from creating a village full of nightlife and crowds. Town residents would like to see the village become a place for them to come enjoy the “party life,” and then leave it all behind while they go back to their own quiet homes. Those of us who are village residents know we already deal with more traffic and noise than we would like. It is imperative for you to know the players in this election because the future of this village depends on it.

We had hoped to be visiting our residents on door-to-door walks by the first of April, but sadly the present situation makes that impossible to do. We would love to speak with people in person. Residents can check our website to send us emails, and we will answer all of them. We are happy to call you as well, or set up a videoconference with you and some of your friends to answer your questions. We are your neighbors and we understand your concerns!

Sincerely,

BARBARA BORSACK
Candidate for Mayor

RICK LAWLER
Candidate for trustee

RAY HARDEN
Candidate for trustee


Friday, May 8, 2020 7:54 AM

𝐄𝐇𝐒𝐭𝐚𝐫 𝐋𝐞𝐭𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐬 𝐓𝐚 𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐄𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐚𝐫 𝐌𝐚𝐲 𝟕𝐭𝐡 𝐄𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐚𝐧

𝐄𝐇𝐒𝐭𝐚𝐫 𝐋𝐞𝐭𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐬 𝐓𝐚 𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐄𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐚𝐫
𝐌𝐚𝐲 𝟕𝐭𝐡 𝐄𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐚𝐧

 

Consistent
East Hampton
May 4, 2020

Dear David,

Thank you to the Elms Party for keeping me informed of important news as it happens. In addition, their consistent emails on East Hampton Village board of trustees deliberations and reflections on good government are important for those of us who remain “at home” during this unprecedented pandemic.

LINDA JAMES

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Shows the Way
East Hampton
April 28, 2020

Dear David,

I have known Barbara Borsack for many years. Because of our close friendship, I know her well. It takes a very special talent to be a strong leader. Knowing Barbara as well as I do, I am confident that she has what it takes to be the next mayor of the Village of East Hampton. Good leadership requires honesty, integrity, good communication skills, confidence to inspire others, resilience, and transparency. I have seen all of these characteristics in Barbara. She has a passion, like I have never known, for both our residents and village. She has the vision and purpose as times are changing to keep this beautiful village protected, yet she is open to new ideas. Her decision-making skills and capabilities are so needed at this time in our history.

A leader is one who knows the way, goes the way, and shows the way. I cast my vote for Barbara Borsack because of my faith in her abilities. We are at a crossroads in this election. Let’s vote to keep East Hampton the most beautiful village in America.

NANCY ANDREWS

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Best Candidate
East Hampton
May 1, 2020

Dear Editor,

I am writing this letter in support of Barbara Borsack for mayor of East Hampton Village. Barbara has lived in East Hampton her entire life. She has worked in many ways to preserve the idyllic life we locals lived growing up here. I could list all the things she has done for East Hampton, but I know most people have already read all of that. I am writing to tell you about her character.

Barbara is a believer in truth. She has a high moral code that cannot be broken. She is hard-working, confident, and self-disciplined. She knows her strengths and abilities and knows how to put them to good use, which she has done for the village for many, many years.

The fact that politics has become a dirty game in East Hampton for this mayoral election is a sad commentary on our small village. Lies are being spread by phone calls and by ads. Please don’t believe them. They are not true. Barbara has never used her position in village government to her advantage. I can’t say that’s true for others in this race.

The thing I know for sure about this mayoral race is that Barbara wants to help maintain East Hampton Village’s bucolic nature while being open to change. We locals are being pushed hard by those who would like to turn our beautiful village into something I don’t believe we want. If you love East Hampton Village, then vote for Barbara Borsack for mayor. She is the best candidate running.

Sincerely,

KAREN MULLEN

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Her Devotion
East Hampton
May 4, 2020

Dear David,

I’ve lived in East Hampton for more than 40 years and can easily say that for the first time I have regrets about living here. I regret that I don’t live in the Village of East Hampton, because if I did I would be able to vote for Barbara Borsack for mayor.

Barbara is one of the most honest, hard-working, committed people I’ve ever met here. When she says something, I know it’s true. When she says that she’ll do something, you can bank on it. She is serious about her devotion to the community, and it’s not to gain something for herself. It’s to make the village a better place for everyone in the community.

Barbara has been supportive of changes that the village needs to undergo so that it is a more vibrant and welcoming community, but also understands that change has to be measured carefully so that the village retains its quality of life.

I’ve worked with Barbara for the past 20 years on many different matters at the East Hampton Healthcare Foundation, where she is a trustee, as a member of the Village Ambulance Association, which heads up our free community A.E.D. program, as a fund-raiser for women’s health, and as a trustee of Stony Brook Southampton Hospital on collaborative projects.

The residents of the village, and of the town as well, will not have any regrets if Barbara Borsack is elected as the new mayor of East Hampton Village.

Sincerely,

SHEILA ROGERS
Director
East Hampton Healthcare Foundation

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Years of Change
East Hampton
April 30, 2020

Dear David,

As a 12th-generation Bonacker, I am proud of my heritage and grateful for having the experience of growing up here, raising my family here, and now enjoying retirement in this beautiful historic village.

When I was growing up we were able to play baseball in the open fields, roller skate in the quiet streets, get our mail at the post office on Newtown Lane, shop at Marley’s, Diamond’s, Bohack’s, Mrs. Epstein’s, and Fanning’s, meet our friends at the Marmador, go to the movies at the Edwards Theater, and go to kindergarten through grade 12 at the school on Newtown Lane. But that was then, and this is now.

Through the years progress has brought changes and challenges to our once quiet village. We have witnessed many changes in the shops along Main Street and Newtown Lane, have increased volume of traffic, causing gridlock in the intersections during rainy summer days, and experienced a growing demand on parking.

During the years of change, our village’s beauty has been maintained by the foresight of our village officials, the East Hampton Historical Society, [Ladies Village] Improvement Society, the Village Preservation Society, and benefactors who have cared for the preservation of the historical buildings, landmarks, and image.

Barbara Borsack, Richard Lawler, and Ray Harden have grown up in East Hampton, raised their families here, have many years of experience in village government, and have pledged to continue their devotion to the history of our area with a vision for the future. The village has many needs as we move forward — an answer to our parking problems, construction of a sewer system for the village core, and preservation of open spaces. These projects will not happen overnight, but must be carefully studied, designed, and adequately funded. I believe Barbara, Rick, and Ray understand the issues and will move forward to maintain the quality of life hoped for by all village residents.

Sincerely,

MARY TALMAGE SISKA

 


Wednesday, May 6, 2020 8:56 AM

𝗜𝗺𝗜𝗌𝗿𝘁𝗮𝗻𝘁 𝗡𝗲𝘄𝘀

Important News

click above to read email from the Elms Party


 

 


Tuesday, May 5, 2020 2:59 PM

𝗕𝗮𝗿𝗯𝗮𝗿𝗮 𝗕𝗌𝗿𝘀𝗮𝗰𝗞 & 𝗥𝗶𝗰𝗵𝗮𝗿𝗱 𝗟𝗮𝘄𝗹𝗲𝗿 𝗌𝗻 𝗪𝗟𝗡𝗚

Link to WLNG Facebook Video

 

𝗗𝗲𝗜𝘂𝘁𝘆 𝗠𝗮𝘆𝗌𝗿 𝗕𝗮𝗿𝗯𝗮𝗿𝗮 𝗕𝗌𝗿𝘀𝗮𝗰𝗞 & 𝗠𝗮𝘆𝗌𝗿 𝗥𝗶𝗰𝗵𝗮𝗿𝗱 𝗟𝗮𝘄𝗹𝗲𝗿 were on radio station WLNG with Gary Sapiane, this morning, to update the community on the COVID-19 response in the Village of East Hampton.


Tuesday, May 5, 2020 11:28 AM

𝗘𝗹𝗲𝗰𝘁 "𝗧𝗵𝗲 𝗘𝗹𝗺𝘀 𝗣𝗮𝗿𝘁𝘆"


Monday, May 4, 2020 11:11 AM

𝗕𝗮𝗿𝗯𝗮𝗿𝗮 & 𝗥𝗶𝗰𝗞 𝗌𝗻 𝗪𝗣𝗣𝗕 𝗥𝗮𝗱𝗶𝗌

Barbara Borsack & Rick Lawler were interviewed this morning on WPPB Southampton by Gianna Volpe on her "Heart of the East End" program to update the Village of East Hampton on their continued response to the COVID-19 crisis.

 


Sunday, May 3, 2020 6:38 PM

𝗡𝗲𝘄 𝗩𝗶𝗱𝗲𝗌 𝗳𝗿𝗌𝗺 𝗕𝗮𝗿𝗯𝗮𝗿𝗮 𝗕𝗌𝗿𝘀𝗮𝗰𝗞

 

New Elms Party Video with Introduction from Barbara Borsack (Candidate for Mayor)


Saturday, May 2, 2020 12:15 PM

𝗘𝗮𝘀𝘁 𝗛𝗮𝗺𝗜𝘁𝗌𝗻 𝗊𝘁𝗮𝗿 𝗔𝗿𝘁𝗶𝗰𝗹𝗲

‘Cautious Change’
Are Elms Party Watchwords

 
 
 
East Hampton Star
April 30, 2020

Barbara Borsack, the deputy mayor of East Hampton Village, who is seeking to become the village’s first female mayor in the June 16 election, and her Elms Party running mates, Mayor Richard Lawler and Ray Harden, the vice chairman of the village’s zoning board of appeals, who are vying for two open board seats, discussed in a joint interview on Monday their policy priorities and plans to help the village emerge from the Covid-19 shutdown. 

“Rick and I met with all the department heads to talk about what it will look like if the governor wants us to start opening up on May 15,” said Ms. Borsack. Earlier this month, the village removed benches from the commercial district and beaches to discourage people from disobeying the social distancing guidelines that have helped prevent the spread of the virus. 

At Main Beach, the benches in front of the pavilion have been cordoned off, and will likely remain so this summer, she said. “There will probably be a walkway so people can get to the bathrooms, and then we’ll probably have someone at the bathroom restricting the number of people who can go in.” The village will also put up signs to let people know they must wear face masks around the pavilion.

As for the beaches themselves. “I don’t think it’s possible to keep people off the beaches, we have a thousand miles of beach,” she said. “People should be able to go to the beach but keep their distance from each other.” How other public spaces such as Herrick Park and the Nature Trail can be safely used are also under discussion, she said. To encourage social distancing on the Nature Trail, she said, “We’re thinking about making it one way.”

The village has already started monitoring the beaches, said Mayor Lawler, who was appointed mayor in January to complete the term of Paul F. Rickenbach Jr. and is seeking his fourth term as trustee. “We had police presence at the beaches last weekend just in case they got overcrowded, and we did shut down parking lot number one at Main Beach.” Other parking areas were cordoned off, and cones were placed in every other parking spot so people could maintain social distancing while getting in and out their cars. “We’re still in the middle of [the pandemic], said Mr. Lawler. “The numbers of positive cases are still going up in Suffolk County, and still going up in the village and the town, albeit slowly.”

Mr. Harden, a co-owner of the Ben Krupinski building company, has been helping manage his firm’s response to the crisis. In addition to providing face masks for employees, the company plans to have working sinks and hand-sanitizing stations at building sites when they are active again. The company successfully applied for a federal loan for small businesses affected by the pandemic, Mr. Harden said, and has been able to keep paying its employees during the shutdown of nonessential construction. 

His decision to run on the Elms Party line, Mr. Harden said, came after Jerry Larsen, a mayoral candidate, invited him to be his running mate. “When Jerry announced, he asked me several times to run with him and each time I declined. Then Barbara and Rick reached out, and I like what they stand for, so I said yes.” 

“Our stand is always, residents come first,” said Ms. Borsack, summing up the Elms Party platform. “Our loyalty is to the residents. We want a vital commercial core, but not at the expense of residents’ peace and enjoyment of their own homes.” 

Mr. Lawler agreed, adding that “I just want business owners to know that we are certainly not anti-business.” That idea is not valid, he said. “The ‘Village of No’ is a misnomer. I don’t even know how that got started.”

“I know how it got started,” chimed in Ms. Borsack. “Years ago somebody wanted to put a gas station on Fithian Lane and the village denied it. Can you imagine a gas station on Fithian Lane?” 

Ms. Borsack and Mr. Lawler said they have always been willing to help both residents and business owners solve problems. “Our doors are open, anybody who wants to reach out to us can,” said Mr. Lawler, citing the village’s quick response when the owners of Wittendale’s Florist and Greenhouses complained that the spring street fair on Newtown Lane was hurting business. 

“We’re not always aware of the issues commercial entities are dealing with,” said Ms. Borsack. 

In the case of Colleen Moeller, the owner of the Petit Blue children’s store who was cited by the village for placing a stuffed animal in front of the shop to attract customers, Ms. Borsack said, “She never came to any of us. You’re not supposed to put things outside your store, because most people don’t want racks of clothes or lawnmowers out on the sidewalk. That’s what the code is there for. But in her particular case, she could have gone to the zoning board and asked for permission to do what she did, but she didn’t.” 

Nevertheless, she said, as mayor she would “check in regularly with code enforcement to see what we can do differently. They know what the issues are and they can help us figure out what we can loosen up on.” 

“We are perfectly willing to bring the code up to date,” said Mr. Lawler. All three candidates said they were in favor of finding ways to speed up the process at the zoning board of appeals. 

They would also allow the village’s historic inns, which have been prevented from holding outdoor gatherings, to hold a few special events and expand operations. “We’re willing to think about some things the inns could do, like allowing gift shops,” said Ms. Borsack. “And is it possible that they could have special event permits a few times a year, yes, because we could control the parking, how many people would be there, when it can be, and what hours it would be.” 

The Elms Party, said Ms. Borsack, is not for the status quo, but for cautious change. “Change is inevitable, and we have to control the change carefully,” she said. “We all feel like we understand what makes East Hampton Village the great place that it is.” 

Getting input from residents will also be a priority, the candidates said. “My favorite job in governing is problem-solving with a group,” said Ms. Borsack. “I don’t want to make the decisions on my own, I want everybody to chime in, because that’s how the best decisions are made.”

“That’s why I joined up with Barbara and Rick,” said Mr. Harden. “That’s the way it’s going to be, going forward, and that’s the way it should be. I don’t like to rush into decisions, I like to hear from every side and get different opinions to make sure that if you’re going to make a change that you’re doing the right thing.”

Mr. Lawler, who is essentially running for a demotion, said he is perfectly fine with once again being a trustee. “My job as mayor and as trustee is to serve the residents of this village and solve problems that are going to make this community a better community. I’m eager to keep building on what we’ve already done.”


Friday, May 1, 2020 5:08 PM

𝗩𝗶𝗹𝗹𝗮𝗎𝗲 𝗘𝗹𝗲𝗰𝘁𝗶𝗌𝗻 𝗣𝗌𝘀𝘁𝗜𝗌𝗻𝗲𝗱

Village Election

Postponed until September 15th


Friday, May 1, 2020 11:28 AM

𝗘𝗛𝗊𝘁𝗮𝗿 / 𝗟𝗲𝘁𝘁𝗲𝗿 𝗧𝗌 𝗘𝗱𝗶𝘁𝗌𝗿 / 𝟬𝟰-𝟯𝟬-𝟮𝟬

For Mayor
East Hampton
April 27, 2020

Hi David,

Pat and I and the whole Ryan clan support Barbara Borsack’s candidacy for mayor of the Village of East Hampton.

She has been and is a wonderful resource for our community!

God Bless America,

JOHN and PATRICIA RYAN


Friday, May 1, 2020 11:21 AM

𝗘𝗛𝗊𝘁𝗮𝗿 / 𝗟𝗲𝘁𝘁𝗲𝗿 𝗧𝗌 𝗘𝗱𝗶𝘁𝗌𝗿 / 𝟬𝟰-𝟯𝟬-𝟮𝟬

Does Not Hesitate
East Hampton

April 26, 2020

Dear David,

I am writing to endorse Ray Harden for village trustee. Ray is a dedicated public servant. He has served as chief of the East Hampton Fire Department, currently serves as Suffolk County fire coordinator, and is a class-A firefighter. He is vice chairman of the Zoning Board of Appeals, a member of the town licensing board, and president of the East Hampton Fire Department Benevolent Association.

In his professional life, Ray worked closely with Ben Krupinski, until Ben’s untimely death in 2018, and believes deeply that we each have a responsibility to care for our community and those who need support — from the elderly to our local churches. Ray does not hesitate to put his money where his mouth is, for example, when the village needs a new roof for the gazebo in Herrick Park or local schools need help constructing a playground.

Ray is a devoted father and grandfather. He resides in the village and understands that the interests of year-round residents and seasonal homeowners are dependent on strong leadership.

As candidates compete for our vote in this election cycle, Ray represents those of us who require little bluster and perform great jobs by the willingness to show up and get the job done.

I hope you will support my friend Ray Harden for village trustee.

KEN WESSBERG


Tuesday, April 28, 2020 10:20 AM

𝗩𝗶𝗹𝗹𝗮𝗎𝗲 𝗚𝗌𝘃𝗲𝗿𝗻𝗺𝗲𝗻𝘁 – 𝗊𝘁𝗮𝗯𝗶𝗹𝗶𝘁𝘆 𝗳𝗌𝗿 𝗥𝗲𝘀𝗶𝗱𝗲𝗻𝘁𝘀

 

𝐕𝐢𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐠𝐞 𝐆𝐚𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐧𝐊𝐞𝐧𝐭 – 𝐒𝐭𝐚𝐛𝐢𝐥𝐢𝐭𝐲 𝐟𝐚𝐫 𝐑𝐞𝐬𝐢𝐝𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐬
click above to read email from the Elms Party


Friday, April 24, 2020 7:51 AM

𝗜𝗺𝗜𝗌𝗿𝘁𝗮𝗻𝘁 𝗕𝗮𝗹𝗮𝗻𝗰𝗲 / 𝗟𝗲𝘁𝘁𝗲𝗿 𝘁𝗌 𝗘𝗱𝗶𝘁𝗌𝗿 𝗘𝗛𝗊𝘁𝗮𝗿 / 𝗧𝗵𝗲 𝗘𝗹𝗺𝘀 𝗣𝗮𝗿𝘁𝘆

𝗜𝗺𝗜𝗌𝗿𝘁𝗮𝗻𝘁 𝗕𝗮𝗹𝗮𝗻𝗰𝗲
EHStar / Letter to Editor / 04-23-20

Dear Editor:

There has been so much press lately about the sign codes and business needs in the village, we think we should clarify a few things in that regard.

Our village code has always been very strict when it comes to signs and postings of all sorts in the village, not only in the commercial core but also in the residential area. Real estate signs are addressed, for instance, as well as banners and signs for nonprofit organizations. This careful attention to detail in our code is one of the reasons our village is considered one of the most beautiful in the country.

All signs are regulated because the residents want our village to maintain the beautiful aesthetic that it has always had. In the business district for instance, if sandwich boards, neon window signs, and banners were to go unregulated, our village would soon look like Coney Island. Even the outdoor display of merchandise is regulated lest our sidewalks become impassable with racks of clothing, lawn mowers, or stacks of shoes lining the way.

When merchants wish to have a sign in their window or on the facade of their building they apply to our East Hampton Village Design Review Board. That board, made up of village residents, examines the size, colors, lighting, and all other aspects of the proposal to determine if the sign meets the standards set forth. They work with the applicant to find a solution to any problems encountered.

If a merchant is not happy with the code as it applies to their circumstance, they can apply to the Zoning Board of Appeals for a variance for their particular need. Again, the zoning board is made up of village residents and determines whether or not a variance will be granted.

Through this process, the application is viewed by many people who have an interest in how our village looks: the Code Enforcement Department, the Design Review Board, and the Zoning Board of Appeals. There is a process by which someone can find relief if the code does not meet the special need they have and relief can be acquired.

We in the Elms Party are far from anti-business. In fact, members of our party own both commercial property and businesses in the village. But since we also live here, we understand the important balance between commercial and residential needs and desires. Our goal is to do our best to attain that balance at all times.

Change can and does happen as needs change, and we are not opposed to making sure we move forward with the times. Our code is a living document, which is often amended. It was only a few years ago we made the change to allow more potted plantings in front of our commercial properties in response to an inquiry from a property owner. But all change needs to be carefully considered, and all voices need to be heard. That is always our goal. We hope all residents agree with that approach.

Jerry Larsen would like you to believe that we are not business friendly, but that could not be further from the truth. We work hard to solve problems that are brought to us by businesses and commercial property owners. We simply put our residents first, and we think that’s a good thing.

Sincerely,

𝗕𝗔𝗥𝗕𝗔𝗥𝗔 𝗕𝗢𝗥𝗊𝗔𝗖𝗞
Candidate for Mayor

𝗥𝗔𝗬 𝗛𝗔𝗥𝗗𝗘𝗡
Candidate for Trustee

𝗥𝗜𝗖𝗞 𝗟𝗔𝗪𝗟𝗘𝗥
Candidate for Trustee


Thursday, April 23, 2020 11:40 AM

𝗕𝗮𝗿𝗯𝗮𝗿𝗮 𝗕𝗌𝗿𝘀𝗮𝗰𝗞 & 𝗥𝗶𝗰𝗵𝗮𝗿𝗱 𝗟𝗮𝘄𝗹𝗲𝗿 𝘄𝗲𝗿𝗲 𝗌𝗻 𝗿𝗮𝗱𝗶𝗌 𝘀𝘁𝗮𝘁𝗶𝗌𝗻 𝗪𝗟𝗡𝗚

𝗗𝗲𝗜𝘂𝘁𝘆 𝗠𝗮𝘆𝗌𝗿 𝗕𝗮𝗿𝗯𝗮𝗿𝗮 𝗕𝗌𝗿𝘀𝗮𝗰𝗞 & 𝗠𝗮𝘆𝗌𝗿 𝗥𝗶𝗰𝗵𝗮𝗿𝗱 𝗟𝗮𝘄𝗹𝗲𝗿 were on radio station WLNG with Gary Sapiane, this morning, to update the community on the COVID-19 response in the Village of East Hampton.


Tuesday, April 21, 2020 8:08 AM

𝗪𝗵𝗮𝘁 𝗞𝗶𝗻𝗱 𝗌𝗳 𝗰𝗌𝗺𝗺𝘂𝗻𝗶𝘁𝘆 𝗮𝗿𝗲 𝘄𝗲?


Photo by Richard Lewin

 

What Kind of Community are We?


Monday, April 20, 2020 11:16 AM

𝗪𝗣𝗣𝗕 𝗥𝗮𝗱𝗶𝗌 𝗜𝗻𝘁𝗲𝗿𝘃𝗶𝗲𝘄 / 𝟬𝟰-𝟮𝟬-𝟮𝟬

 

 

Mayor Richard Lawler & Deputy Mayor Barbara Borsack were interviewed on Southampton radio station WPPB this morning on The Heart of the East End show with host Gianna Volpe.


Friday, April 17, 2020 7:52 AM

𝗪𝗲 𝗣𝗹𝗲𝗱𝗎𝗲 / 𝗘𝗛𝗊𝗧𝗔𝗥 / 𝗟𝗲𝘁𝘁𝗲𝗿 𝘁𝗌 𝗘𝗱𝗶𝘁𝗌𝗿 / 𝗧𝗵𝗲 𝗘𝗹𝗺𝘀 𝗣𝗮𝗿𝘁𝘆

We Pledge     
EHStar / Letter to Editor / April 16th   
By: Barbara Borsack, Ray Harden & Richard Lawler

Dear Editor:     

We would like to address some issues surrounding this coming village election that have been greatly distorted and need clarification. Our party, the Elms Party, is the only one that can say we are all lifelong, full-time residents of this village, and we know very well the delicate balance between residential and commercial interests, because we’ve lived it all our lives.     

This week we would like to talk about the beautiful inns that have been part of village life for so many years. All of our inns are what we call “pre-existing, non-conforming” uses in residential zones. This simply means that they were in existence before our zoning codes were written and are commercial uses in residential zones. As such, they need to be carefully regulated to protect the quality of life in the quiet neighborhoods that surround them. Over the years these inns have moved from being small B-and-Bs run by local families to establishments owned by corporations often having no local connection at all other than their business ties.     

We don’t need to look far to see what can happen if these uses are allowed to expand unchecked. The residents of Montauk have been working with our town board for years to try to control the businesses in their neighborhoods that began as small, quiet restaurants but have in recent years become busy nightclubs. Because live music was permitted under town code, they have become concert venues, bringing traffic, noise, and alcohol-fueled crime to their once peaceful streets. It is a cautionary tale that our village government must be cognizant of lest we allow the same thing to happen here.     

We are not opposed to all change, even in the area of how our country inns are operated. But special events requiring tents and live music that can be heard throughout our local streets must be closely regulated.     We believe that the best way to control what happens in our residential neighborhoods is to allow a certain number of special permit events at our inns. In this way we can control the dates, hours, and frequency of those events. Special permits can be granted by the village for weddings and other outdoor events while making sure there are plans in place to control the issues surrounding them. This is the best way to protect the residents so they can enjoy the peace and quiet of their own backyards during the summer months.     

In contrast, Jerry Larsen supports the ability for the inns to have large gatherings with amplified music without any oversight that the special permit process provides. We don’t believe that his views are in line with our village residents’ views. We believe that the inns should be allowed to conduct business only with proper restraints written into the code. The special permit process would give us the tool we need to control what can happen on properties that are pre-existing non-conforming. This is exactly what the zoning code is for.     We believe that our first responsibility is to our residents and will do our very best to protect them at all times, because we live here and we understand the need to protect our beautiful village. And that’s what we pledge to do.     

Sincerely,     

BARBARA BORSACK     
Candidate for mayor     

RAY HARDEN     
Candidate for trustee

RICHARD LAWLER
Candidate for trustee

THE ELMS PARTY


Friday, April 17, 2020 7:37 AM

𝗚𝗻𝗶𝗌𝗻 𝗖𝗌𝗻𝘁𝗿𝗮𝗰𝘁𝘀 / 𝗘𝗛𝗊𝘁𝗮𝗿 / 𝗟𝗲𝘁𝘁𝗲𝗿 𝘁𝗌 𝗘𝗱𝗶𝘁𝗌𝗿 / 𝗥𝗶𝗰𝗵𝗮𝗿𝗱 𝗟𝗮𝘄𝗹𝗲𝗿

Union Contracts
EHStar / Letter to Editor / April 16th
Richard Lawler - Mayor


To The Star:     

On Monday, April 6, 2020, at 5 p.m., Jerry Larsen produced a short video on Facebook in which he interviews two East Hampton Police Benefit Association officers who purportedly represent the entire P.B.A. in an endorsement of Jerry’s candidacy for mayor of East Hampton Village.     

My friends in the P.B.A. tell me that they were dismayed by the video, since not all of them had been consulted about the endorsement or the video. Some of them felt that the P.B.A. should remain neutral during this campaign and that what their leadership did was inappropriate. They feel it was a huge embarrassment to the fine police officers that serve this village every day.     

They don’t deserve to be demeaned by Jerry Larsen for the purposes of his own political gain. Unfortunately, Jerry was able to manipulate his good friend, the P.B.A. president, to do what the rest of the Police Department found to be abhorrent. To make matters worse, the embarrassment will continue as Jerry sends a copy of the alleged endorsement letter to everyone on his campaign list. Having said that, the video also depicted the usual false statements and misrepresentations we have all come to expect from Jerry.     

One of the main issues discussed was contract negotiations, and the fact that no one from the village board participates in the actual negotiations. The board does not participate on advice of our labor attorney, whose job it is to conduct the negotiations and report back to us regarding the progress. When the issues are worked out between our attorney and the P.B.A. attorney, and a settlement satisfactory to both sides is reached, the agreement is then presented to the board and the entire P.B.A. for final approval. If both sides agree, then a legally binding contract is signed and becomes the basis of an agreement, which must be followed for the duration of the contract. What could be more fair than that? Each side presents their case through their legal representative, and through negotiation each side gets some of what they want. That’s how all union contracts are settled.     

Additionally, Jerry seeks to spread the lie that somehow morale at the department is low due to unfair disciplinary treatment by the village board. Again, a conclusion that is an outright lie since he knows that most disciplinary measures don’t rise to the level of the village board for consideration. They are handled by a longstanding process established by New York State law and union contract agreements. Any other process, like that proposed by Jerry, would most definitely lead to unfair treatment of the officer. That is evidenced by the fact that a review of disciplinary cases handled by Jerry, while he was chief of police, found at least one instance of obvious bias against an officer. In that case, the resulting discipline was adjusted to a more appropriate level given the alleged transgression. I want to point out that the disciplinary process Jerry now complains about was instituted in February 2014 (before he was fired) with his full support. Obviously, the P.B.A. officials are not aware of that.     

I can say that during my 35 years as a police officer, I never viewed my police union contract as a defense against “roughing up a perp” because I was well trained and I believed that sort of thing is way beyond the bounds of good policing and is unacceptable behavior. The poor judgment of Jerry Larsen in allowing this unfortunate comment to pass without correcting it is the kind of failure of leadership he has displayed all too often. And it is unfortunate that despite his being disciplined as chief of police and his mandated sensitivity training, he still doesn’t get it.     

I think it’s become abundantly clear that Jerry feels that he has all the answers and if given the chance, he would always depend on his own flawed judgment, rather than take time to gather facts before making a decision that will affect all village residents for years to come. I don’t think that is what residents want or deserve.     


RICK LAWLER     

Mayor - East Hampton Village

 


Thursday, April 16, 2020 11:49 AM

𝗚𝘀𝗲𝗱 𝗛𝗶𝘀 𝗣𝗌𝘀𝗶𝘁𝗶𝗌𝗻 / 𝗘𝗛𝗊𝘁𝗮𝗿 / 𝗟𝗲𝘁𝘁𝗲𝗿 𝘁𝗌 𝗘𝗱𝗶𝘁𝗌𝗿 / 𝗥𝗶𝗰𝗵𝗮𝗿𝗱 𝗟𝗮𝘄𝗹𝗲𝗿

Used His Position
EHStar / Letter to Editor / March 20,2020 

By: Richard Lawler

To the Editor,

Jerry Larsen has continually tried to rewrite history when it comes to his past transgressions.

His missteps have been well documented both in his personnel file with the village and in newspaper reports. He has never been able to disssociate his police job from his own personal interests. 

In addition to all the issues raised in his March 19 letter to the editor, he continually used his position in the police department to solicit business for his private security company. It created a situation of an unfair advantage to other civilian-owned security companies. 

One company made numerous complaints regarding unfair solicitation of their business clients by Jerry using his position as chief. That continued even after Jerry was counseled many times to stop. That conduct, coupled with Jerry’s other misconduct, convinced the village board he could no longer continue as chief. Jerry was told that the village would not renew his employment contract and that he may potentially be facing further disciplinary action. He chose to retire. I think people can decide what that means in terms of his termination. He certainly didn’t leave of his own volition.

As to the anonymous letters he keeps referring to, only Jerry would make an accusation as to their origin without a single iota of proof. That I believe says a lot about his character.

If Jerry had any real ideas to improve the village, he wouldn’t be wasting his time with unsubstantiated accusations.

He and his biggest supporters have suggested that the pre-existing, nonconforming inns on Main Street should be able to expand way beyond their current mandate. He supports the inns’ desires to have large gatherings with loud amplified music. He would turn our beautiful Main Street into “nightclub row.” Imagine the detrimental effect that would have on the surrounding neighborhood. He would fundamentally change our beautiful village into the Coney Island of the East End.

In contrast, Barbara Borsack, Ray Harden, and myself are for incremental change where appropriate if that change is commensurate with the character of our village.

RICHARD LAWLER


Thursday, April 16, 2020 11:37 AM

𝗪𝗌𝗿𝗞𝗶𝗻𝗎 𝗧𝗌𝗎𝗲𝘁𝗵𝗲𝗿 / 𝗘𝗛𝗊𝘁𝗮𝗿 / 𝗟𝗲𝘁𝘁𝗲𝗿 𝘁𝗌 𝗘𝗱𝗶𝘁𝗌𝗿 / 𝗕𝗮𝗿𝗯𝗮𝗿𝗮 𝗕𝗌𝗿𝘀𝗮𝗰𝗞

Working Together
EHStar Letter to Editor April 4,2020
By: Barbara Borsack

Dear Editor:

We live in a special place where neighbors help neighbors in times of need, where volunteers get up in the middle of the night to respond to a crisis, and where individuals and community groups rally to provide food and other help to persons in need. This is the East Hampton I know and love and have been a part of all of my life. In this crisis we see it clearly and many folks are a part of it once again.

This week, I’ve seen some amazing examples of our very special community. I’ve seen local businesses taking care of people, like Round Swamp Farm delivering baskets of food to some of our elderly friends who are dealing with isolation and difficulty securing supplies. I’m aware of a restaurant manager who has been laid off because of this crisis and is now volunteering to help get food to people in need. I saw the fisherman from Montauk who gave away his catch to people in the community who needed food.

I’ve devoted a good deal of my time as an adult volunteering to meet the needs of this community, so I understand how important it is to reach out to each other and assist where needed. I’ve been a volunteer member of the East Hampton Ambulance Association since 1990. I’m a charter member of the East Hampton Healthcare Foundation and still serve on its board, and I’m in my third term as a member of the board at Southampton Hospital, where I’ve been a strong advocate for a 24/7 facility in East Hampton for emergency care.

I’m excited to see that dream coming to fruition as plans have been developed and funds are being raised now to see that become a reality in the next three years. In 2011, I founded the Southampton Hospital ambassador program, which uses volunteers to guide patients and visitors at the hospital by accompanying them to testing sites, answering questions and problem solving, and assisting staff with patient transports and errands of all sorts. So my concern for this community, its residents, and their medical needs is a lifelong one.

Those many years involved with the medical community on the East End have taught me one thing: We have a top notch system of emergency services here, from patient care to transportation to our excellent emergency room at Stony Brook Southampton Hospital. We are in good hands! The hospital has been busy creating new patient rooms and expanding their emergency room facilities for triage and bed space to face this unusual challenge. The Healthcare Center at Pantigo Place is working hard to accommodate their patients. Our volunteer emergency services folks are answering every call with skill and care. Our hope is that we will weather this crisis without overtaxing any of the professionals and volunteers who are here for you if you need them.

If residents need help, they should call the new hot line set up by the hospital to answer questions and concerns at 631-638-1320. This line will be answered from 8 a.m. to midnight Monday through Friday. If you feel you need to be tested for Covid-19 you can call 1-888-364-3065 for the Stony Brook testing site or the newly opened Riverhead site. Drive-through testing at the Riverhead ProHealth facility is by appointment only and is open to all, not limited to ProHEALTH primary care patients. Individuals experiencing Covid-19 symptoms and wishing to speak to a medical professional, or who wish to make an appointment at the Riverhead drive-through testing facility, can call the ProHEALTH dedicated hotline at 1-516-874-0411. The Riverhead drive-through testing site is located at 1149 Old Country Road, Riverhead, Monday to Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Saturday and Sunday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m

Remember. If you need to go to the emergency room and it is at all possible for family to drive you there, please find your own transportation. Speak to your health-care provider first. If you need an ambulance, there will be one to respond as long as we take care not to overtax our system and keep our providers well.

Remember not to congregate and practice social distancing! If you want to walk on the beach, do it, but stay away from others. We have many miles of wide beautiful beaches, and there is room to walk without getting too close to others in the process. We can do this as long as we are working together!

We are a strong, resilient community, and we will weather this storm with everyone’s cooperation. Please stay home, take care of yourselves, and be well!

Sincerely,

BARBARA BORSACK


Thursday, April 16, 2020 11:20 AM

𝗕𝗮𝗿𝗯𝗮𝗿𝗮 𝗕𝗌𝗿𝘀𝗮𝗰𝗞 & 𝗥𝗶𝗰𝗵𝗮𝗿𝗱 𝗟𝗮𝘄𝗹𝗲𝗿 𝗌𝗻 𝗪𝗟𝗡𝗚 𝗥𝗮𝗱𝗶𝗌

𝗗𝗲𝗜𝘂𝘁𝘆 𝗠𝗮𝘆𝗌𝗿 𝗕𝗮𝗿𝗯𝗮𝗿𝗮 𝗕𝗌𝗿𝘀𝗮𝗰𝗞 & 𝗠𝗮𝘆𝗌𝗿 𝗥𝗶𝗰𝗵𝗮𝗿𝗱 𝗟𝗮𝘄𝗹𝗲𝗿 were on radio station WLNG with Gary Sapiane, this morning, to update the community on the COVID-19 response in the Village of East Hampton.

WLNG Facebook Video


Tuesday, April 14, 2020 12:18 PM

𝗡𝗌𝘄 𝗟𝗲𝘁'𝘀 𝗧𝗮𝗹𝗞 𝗔𝗯𝗌𝘂𝘁 𝗊𝗶𝗎𝗻𝘀

 

Now Let's Talk About Signs


Thursday, April 9, 2020 12:22 PM

𝗕𝗮𝗿𝗯𝗮𝗿𝗮 𝗕𝗌𝗿𝘀𝗮𝗰𝗞 & 𝗥𝗶𝗰𝗵𝗮𝗿𝗱 𝗟𝗮𝘄𝗹𝗲𝗿 𝗌𝗻 𝗪𝗟𝗡𝗚 𝗥𝗮𝗱𝗶𝗌

 

𝗗𝗲𝗜𝘂𝘁𝘆 𝗠𝗮𝘆𝗌𝗿 𝗕𝗮𝗿𝗯𝗮𝗿𝗮 𝗕𝗌𝗿𝘀𝗮𝗰𝗞 & 𝗠𝗮𝘆𝗌𝗿 𝗥𝗶𝗰𝗵𝗮𝗿𝗱 𝗟𝗮𝘄𝗹𝗲𝗿 were on radio station WLNG with Gary Sapiane, this morning, to update the community on the COVID-19 response in the Village of East Hampton.

 

WLNG Facebook Video


Wednesday, April 8, 2020 7:45 AM

𝗟𝗲𝘁𝘀 𝗧𝗮𝗹𝗞 𝗔𝗯𝗌𝘂𝘁 𝗊𝗌𝗺𝗲 𝗜𝘀𝘀𝘂𝗲𝘀


Photo by Richard Lewin

 

Lets Talk About Some Issues

 


Thursday, April 2, 2020 9:40 AM

𝗕𝗮𝗿𝗯𝗮𝗿𝗮 𝗕𝗌𝗿𝘀𝗮𝗰𝗞 & 𝗥𝗶𝗰𝗵𝗮𝗿𝗱 𝗟𝗮𝘄𝗹𝗲𝗿 𝗌𝗻 𝗪𝗟𝗡𝗚 𝗥𝗮𝗱𝗶𝗌

𝗗𝗲𝗜𝘂𝘁𝘆 𝗠𝗮𝘆𝗌𝗿 𝗕𝗮𝗿𝗯𝗮𝗿𝗮 𝗕𝗌𝗿𝘀𝗮𝗰𝗞 & 𝗠𝗮𝘆𝗌𝗿 𝗥𝗶𝗰𝗵𝗮𝗿𝗱 𝗟𝗮𝘄𝗹𝗲𝗿 were on radio station WLNG with Gary Sapiane, this morning, to update the community on the COVID-19 response in the Village of East Hampton.

 

WLNG Facebook Link to interview


Monday, March 30, 2020 12:54 PM

𝗕𝗮𝗿𝗯𝗮𝗿𝗮 𝗕𝗌𝗿𝘀𝗮𝗰𝗞 & 𝗥𝗶𝗰𝗞 𝗟𝗮𝘄𝗹𝗲𝗿 𝗶𝗻𝘁𝗲𝗿𝘃𝗶𝗲𝘄 𝘁𝗵𝗶𝘀 𝗌𝗻 𝗪𝗣𝗣𝗕 𝗊𝗌𝘂𝘁𝗵𝗮𝗺𝗜𝘁𝗌𝗻

𝗕𝗮𝗿𝗯𝗮𝗿𝗮 𝗕𝗌𝗿𝘀𝗮𝗰𝗞 & 𝗥𝗶𝗰𝗞 𝗟𝗮𝘄𝗹𝗲𝗿 were interviewed this morning on WPPB radio Southampton with Gianna Volpe regarding the continuing Covid-19 crisis.

 


Click on Logo to hear interview

 

 


Monday, March 30, 2020 9:18 AM

𝗠𝗲𝘀𝘀𝗮𝗎𝗲 𝗙𝗿𝗌𝗺 𝗕𝗮𝗿𝗯𝗮𝗿𝗮 𝗕𝗌𝗿𝘀𝗮𝗰𝗞


Photo by Richard Lewin

 A message from Barbara Borsack

 


Monday, March 30, 2020 8:55 AM

𝐋𝐢𝐯𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐍𝐞𝐱𝐭 𝐃𝐚𝐚𝐫 𝐓𝐚 𝐇𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐚𝐫𝐲

𝐋𝐢𝐯𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐍𝐞𝐱𝐭 𝐃𝐚𝐚𝐫 𝐓𝐚 𝐇𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐚𝐫𝐲
"The Replacement of the East Hampton LIRR Bridges"
By Richard Lewin



Thursday, March 26, 2020 10:45 AM

𝗚𝗌𝗌𝗱 𝗠𝗌𝗿𝗻𝗶𝗻𝗎 𝗙𝗿𝗶𝗲𝗻𝗱𝘀

 

These are unprecedented times and as an elected official I am busier than I ever have been. As we work on keeping essential services running smoothly while protecting our dedicated and amazing employees, we are also trying hard to answer the unending inquiries from residents, friends, and media.  We are inundated with texts, emails, and phone calls. So please understand that I am not able to continually monitor my FB page.

Please, if you have a question or concern, there is staff at village hall and you can call there at 324-4150. The police department is fully functioning (631-324-0777 - please use 911 for emergencies only!) and you can call there. The village FB page and website post regular updates as do the town’s. Please know I will do my best to address questions however they arrive, but if you don’t get an immediate response it’s simply because I haven’t even seen it yet. We are all trying our best in new territory and ask for your patience!

Please stay at home and stay safe. If you feel unwell contact your local healthcare provider and if you need to go to the ER try to find a family member to take you if at all possible. Our emergency services will respond if necessary but remember we need to keep them healthy and available as well.

We are all in this together-let’s be the community we know we are! Let’s look out for each other, check on our neighbors (especially those who are alone), and let’s pull each other through this crisis with generosity and grace!


Tuesday, March 24, 2020 11:19 AM

𝗜𝗻𝘁𝗲𝗿𝘃𝗶𝗲𝘄 𝗌𝗻 𝗪𝗟𝗡𝗚 𝗿𝗲𝗎𝗮𝗿𝗱𝗶𝗻𝗎 𝗖𝗌𝘃𝗶𝗱-𝟭𝟵 𝗟𝗌𝗰𝗮𝗹 𝗥𝗲𝘀𝗜𝗌𝗻𝘀𝗲

WLNG's Gary Sapiane interviewed Barbara Borsack & Richard Lawler this morning regarding the local response to the Covid-19 crisis.

 

 


Monday, March 23, 2020 6:10 PM

𝗕𝗮𝗿𝗯𝗮𝗿𝗮 𝗕𝗌𝗿𝘀𝗮𝗰𝗞 & 𝗥𝗶𝗰𝗞 𝗟𝗮𝘄𝗹𝗲𝗿 𝗌𝗻 𝗟𝗧𝗩-𝗙𝗮𝗰𝘁𝘀@𝗙𝗶𝘃𝗲

Barbara Borsack & Rick Lawler were guests on LTV's Facts@Five this afternoon./

They gave an update on Covid-19 in East Hampton Village.  

 

Click the link to view the video  Live@Five 03-23-2020


Friday, March 20, 2020 7:58 AM

𝗜𝗻 𝗠𝗮𝘆𝗌𝗿𝗮𝗹 𝗥𝗮𝗰𝗲, 𝗮 𝗖𝗌𝗻𝘁𝗲𝘀𝘁 𝗌𝗳 𝗜𝗱𝗲𝗮𝘀

𝗜𝗻 𝗠𝗮𝘆𝗌𝗿𝗮𝗹 𝗥𝗮𝗰𝗲, 𝗮 𝗖𝗌𝗻𝘁𝗲𝘀𝘁 𝗌𝗳 𝗜𝗱𝗲𝗮𝘀     
E.H.Star / Opinion / March 19, 2020

Despite the acrimony and a hint about a surprise third candidate, the prospect of a contested election for East Hampton Village mayor has already proven to be a good thing. In years past, when Paul F. Rickenbach Jr. ran unchallenged, there was scarce debate or even airing of issues. Now, with Barbara Borsack, the current deputy mayor, Jerry Larsen, a retired village police chief, and, apparently, Tiger Graham, a village trustee, seeking the center chair, it seems everything is up for discussion.

In large part, the contest of ideas comes down to two competing visions of East Hampton. Ms. Borsack represents a residents-first status quo. Mr. Larsen, who lived outside of the village until he decided to run, has adopted the views of business owners and commercial landlords. Mr. Graham’s official pronouncements will be forthcoming; how he will find a place in this spectrum is still unclear.

What is clear is that the fragile balance between residents’ needs and desires and the demands of the commercial sector is really what the growing battle is all about.

This is also the village's 100th year since incorporation. In that time, successive generations of residents have chosen elected officials who valued tradition over change. We believe that this should be the victorious principle when the village polling places close on June 16.

The world around us may be in serious straits but East Hampton’s time-honored values remain on solid footing and will help us pull through.


Thursday, March 19, 2020 10:00 AM

𝗟𝗲𝗮𝗱𝗲𝗿𝘀𝗵𝗶𝗜 𝗶𝗻 𝗩𝗶𝗹𝗹𝗮𝗎𝗲 𝗛𝗮𝗹𝗹


Thursday, March 19, 2020 9:55 AM

𝗘𝗹𝗲𝗰𝘁


Thursday, March 19, 2020 7:59 AM

𝗢𝘂𝗿 𝗧𝗌𝗜 𝗣𝗿𝗶𝗌𝗿𝗶𝘁𝗶𝗲𝘀


Thursday, March 19, 2020 7:41 AM

𝗝𝗌𝗶𝗻 𝗚𝘀


Friday, March 13, 2020 7:57 AM

𝗕𝗮𝗿𝗯𝗮𝗿𝗮 𝗕𝗌𝗿𝘀𝗮𝗰𝗞 𝗟𝗲𝘁𝘁𝗲𝗿 𝘁𝗌 𝗘𝗱𝗶𝘁𝗌𝗿 𝗘𝗮𝘀𝘁 𝗛𝗮𝗺𝗜𝘁𝗌𝗻 𝗊𝘁𝗮𝗿 (𝗠𝗮𝗿𝗰𝗵 𝟭𝟮, 𝟮𝟬𝟮𝟬)

Continuous Breach
East Hampton, March 6, 2020

Dear Editor:

People who know me will tell you I’m not a person who likes to speak ill of others, but there comes a time in life when not speaking up against untruths and allowing anyone to be bullied with false accusations can no longer be tolerated. For me, that time arrived last week with Jerry Larsen’s outrageous letter to The Star, full of so many inaccuracies as to be worthy of a true work of fiction. I would like to clarify a few points.

First, for a very long time village law has not allowed “fast food” establishments, and for a very long time has worked well at eliminating any proliferation of the fast-food chains in the village. Dylan’s Candy Store, which is not a restaurant and does not have seating, met the definition of fast food when it wanted to sell ice cream. They applied to the village to be allowed to serve ice cream and their application was granted by the East Hampton Village Zoning Board of Appeals. They’ve been serving ice cream ever since.

The village board had already made a decision to take garbage cans off the beaches, which we did last summer. They will not be back on the beaches this summer in our continuing effort to keep our beaches clean. That decision was made in conjunction with the East Hampton Town Trustees, who have jurisdiction over the beaches.

The inns in the village are all in pre-existing, non-conforming locations, which means that they were already in operation prior to zoning. Because they are in residential neighborhoods their expansion is strictly regulated because the village is committed to protecting the residents in the neighborhoods surrounding them, restricting the noise and traffic that would accompany many of the expansions of such use. The present village board is open to some changes in the restrictions on their use, and is open to granting permission for some amenities that will not disturb the peace and quiet of the residential neighborhoods surrounding them. But our residents and the peaceful enjoyment of their homes are always our first priority.

The village board has previously purchased hybrid vehicles for their fleet. However, when it was suggested years ago that the police department could use hybrids, the department quickly nixed the idea because the technology was not yet at a place where they were appropriate for police work. Now the technology has improved, and we are able to purchase them for the police department. I believe the village should be on a plan to phase out fossil fuels, and replacing vehicles with electric is a priority.

I have no desire to address all of Mr. Larsen’s sad campaign accusations, but the facts are the facts, and the public has the right to know that he has never been one to be bothered by facts.

I prefer to deal in facts such as these:

Jerry Larsen was a problem employee from the moment he took office as chief of the East Hampton Village Police Department.

Chief Larson was required to attend sensitivity training due to racially charged comments he made at a public event (from the microphone), which resulted in police officers from neighboring departments calling for his resignation.

Chief Larsen spent more time in executive sessions with the village board than any other employee, in attempts by the board to counsel him that inappropriate behavior by a department head would not be tolerated.

Chief Larsen was disciplined for numerous instances of poor judgment, which included mishandling of his police budget, and the inappropriate personal use of his village-issued cellphone and vehicle.

Chief Larsen was asked to divest himself of his interest in his security business, which was becoming a conflict of interest with his work. He promptly transferred his interest to his wife, and continued to run it anyway.

Jerry Larsen’s continuous breach of sound ethical practices in his conduct as chief of police finally resulted in the village board informing him that his contract would not be renewed. However, in consideration of his many years as an employee, he would be allowed to retire and was presented with the traditional proclamation. Jerry Larsen’s response was to file a frivolous lawsuit against the village as an act of revenge. This lawsuit was summarily dismissed by the court. It’s unfortunate that his attempts to exact revenge have cost the taxpayers thousands of dollars in legal fees.

Despite all this, in his quest to gain more power in the village, he decided to run for the position of mayor. Since he lives in the town, not the village, and has for his entire adult life, he needed to establish residency so he rented a small apartment on Newtown Lane where he could pretend to live. Then he began attending village board meetings and formed an election platform from all the issues that were being addressed by the board at the time (Herrick Park, downtown revitalization, sewage treatment, parking, etc.). Who is following whose lead?

Now, he is in the process of trying to exact his final revenge against the only two members of the board (who voted to let him go) who are still active, by spreading lies and rumors as well as trying to take credit for everything the board is acting on.

I trust that the village residents know that the only type of leading Jerry Larsen is doing is to foster his own personal interests because he has proven that time and time again. The village deserved a better chief of police, which we now have. (Statistics clearly show incredible increases in patrols and enforcement since our present chief took command.) And the village deserves a mayor with more integrity, who actually lives in the village, and pays village taxes like every other property owner.

Sincerely,

BARBARA BORSACK

East Hampton Village trustee

 


Friday, March 13, 2020 7:50 AM

𝗥𝗶𝗰𝗵𝗮𝗿𝗱 𝗟𝗮𝘄𝗹𝗲𝗿 𝗟𝗲𝘁𝘁𝗲𝗿 𝘁𝗌 𝗘𝗱𝗶𝘁𝗌𝗿 𝗘𝗮𝘀𝘁 𝗛𝗮𝗺𝗜𝘁𝗌𝗻 𝗊𝘁𝗮𝗿 (𝗠𝗮𝗿𝗰𝗵 𝟭𝟮, 𝟮𝟬𝟮𝟬)

Democracy at Work
East Hampton, March 6, 2020

Dear Editor,

I write in response to Jerry Larsen’s letter to the editor in last week’s Star.

Unlike what Jerry Larsen would have you believe, he is not the first to have discussed possible changes to our East Hampton Village Code. Many of the ideas he claims to have conceived have been discussed in various forms in the past, but did not become codified for various reasons. In many cases, a consensus could not be reached because of some differences among board members as well as concerned residents at the time. After all, that is democracy at work.

Remember, that this village is 80 to 85 percent residential and the village board must respond to the residents’ needs as well as the business community requests. It’s not always easy to come to a consensus between two differing viewpoints. A good example of that was the village board meeting on March 5. During the public comments at the meeting, it became obvious that not all businesses are in favor of the street fairs in the village, particularly considering the time of year and when street closings are involved. Your board is actively working to foster a solution that is acceptable to both sides.

Anyone who has bothered to contact the board with concerns becomes keenly aware of how hard we try to accommodate when possible. It is not village government’s responsibility to organize or actively direct these large community events. The board simply grants the permit for the event based on community input and then, where possible, we provide the appropriate support in the form of policing and Department of Public Works staffing and equipment. Jerry Larsen’s notion that East Hampton Village is the “village of no” is completely false. This village hosts six large community events every year, beginning with the Polar Bear Plunge (350 people in attendance), the Spring Fair, the Artists and Writers softball game, the August Street Fair, The Fall Street Fair, and the Christmas Parade and Street Fair. That is as much or more than other communities on the East End host. Sorry Jerry Larsen, but your disinformation campaign is not working.

Jerry Larsen consistently tries to demean the hard work of this village board by trying to find every little thing he perceives that is wrong with the village. I prefer to concentrate on all the things that are good with our community. For example, the preservation of our historic sites, the recently begun initiative to protect our surface waters, the refurbishing of Herrick Park, the research into a new parking system for the future as well as a sewer system, and the recently talked about traffic advisory committee. All of this will help bolster the success of our commercial core businesses.

Jerry Larsen claims we are following his lead. This couldn’t be further from the truth. I remind you that his lead as village police chief led to his receiving many reprimands and severe punishment (he forfeited 30 days’ pay) for mismanagement of the East Hampton Village Police Department.

His lack of self-awareness in order to reflect on his numerous shortcomings as a leader eventually led to his being fired in 2016 by a unanimous decision of the village board. (He does collect retirement from New York State because he had vested in the retirement system.) He has sought retribution in the form of frivolous lawsuits and constant Freedom of Information Act requests (18 so far) from the village since his termination.

Additionally, he has made outrageous claims of misconduct by everyone else with no proof whatsoever. Is that the character of a leader? I think not.

Jerry Larsen wants to fundamentally change this village overnight by allowing loud amplified music at our quaint old inns and downtown businesses. That’s how the problems with “night clubs” in Montauk began. Once that happens here, we will never get back the beautiful, quiet village that currently draws an overwhelming majority of tourists to our community.

In contrast, Barbara Borsack, I, and Ray Harden support gradual, incremental change after a thorough vetting for all the residents to review. Then, and only then, will we move forward with reasonable changes that contribute to our wonderful way of life for both residents and business owners alike.

RICK LAWLER

East Hampton Village mayor


Thursday, March 5, 2020 11:33 AM

𝗪𝗮𝘁𝗲𝗿/𝗪𝗮𝘆𝘀

East Hampton Village Board members Barbara Borsack & Richard Lawler attended the opening of "Water/Ways" at Clinton Academy on Saturday afternoon, February 29th.

https://indyeastend.com/arts/indy-snaps/water-ways/


Wednesday, February 26, 2020 6:51 PM

𝗘𝗮𝘀𝘁 𝗛𝗮𝗺𝗜𝘁𝗌𝗻 𝗜𝗻𝗱𝗲𝗜𝗲𝗻𝗱𝗲𝗻𝘁 𝗔𝗿𝘁𝗶𝗰𝗹𝗲 (𝗙𝗲𝗯 𝟮𝟱𝘁𝗵)

East Hampton Village Mayor Richard Lawler announced Friday a coming improvement over the police interceptor utility vehicles, currently in use.

At the February 21 monthly board of trustees meeting, he detailed the purchase of a 2020 Ford Police Interceptor Utility Hybrid SUV, which is a Ford Explorer modified for police use. It could potentially save taxpayers between $3500 and $5700 per year in fuel costs, Lawler said.

“It would also contribute to ‘making the planet a better place,’” he added.

The village hasn’t committed to a full fleet, but will assess the matter down the road.

A $10,000 check was also presented to the board from the Village Preservation Society of East Hampton to be used toward the restoration of the Dominy shops on North Main Street.

The planned exhibition space is filled with Dominy memorabilia, including the East Hampton Historical Society’s collection of tools from the clock shop; many pieces of furniture, including a tall-case clock; and Nathaniel Dominy’s memorandum book, which was purchased by previous Mayor Paul Rickenbach and his wife, Jean, who donated it to the village.

The money will fund the recreation of the original oak workbench. The check was handed over by preservation society board member Mary Busch. Also present was board member Joan Osborne.

Deputy Mayor Barbara Borsack also announced the creation of a new Facebook page for the village.

“It should be up and running within the next few weeks,” Borsack said. “It’s an excellent and easy way for people to contact us. The public can leave comments on the page and ask questions. So be on the lookout for that.”

karen@karenfredericks.com

https://indyeastend.com/news-opinion/south-fork/village-board-buys-hybrid-vehicle/

 


Friday, February 21, 2020 8:03 AM

Comprensive Plan Update

One of the issues the Village Board needs to address is the need for an updated Comprehensive Plan for the Village. With sea-level rise and global warming new issues of importance, and resources available now in the area of renewable energy, there are many reasons to look again at our direction and priorities as a community. In addition, water quality, preservation, green space, workforce housing, parking, and traffic are more acute today than they were twenty years ago and new technology, science, and viewpoints should be discussed and considered going forward.
 
In the late 1990s the East Hampton Village Board of Trustees formed a committee of stakeholders, both residents and business owners, to discuss the future direction of East Hampton Village. Barbara Borsack, who was at that time a member of the Zoning Board of Appeals, was chosen to chair what would become the Comprehensive Plan Committee. When Barbara was asked to run for a seat on the village board in the 2000 election, she was replaced as chair of the committee by member Susan Ecker, who skillfully guided the committee to complete their task.
 
For the following two years the committee met regularly to talk about concerns and desires for the village, and the Comprehensive Plan was adopted by the village board in 2002. The plan’s vision statement begins with “The Village of East Hampton treasures its extraordinary natural beauty and the architectural styles added by generations of residents who sought to enhance the natural beauty of the area rather than to overwhelm such rare splendor.” It goes on to address the protection and preservation of the character of the village, seeking to secure the limits of the areas occupied by industrial and commercial enterprises as related to the area reserved for residential. Maintenance of open green spaces, historic structures, and quality of life were emphasized as being of utmost importance.
 
One of the results of this plan was the formation of the Village Planning and Zoning Committee, who were to meet regularly to continue the work of examining and updating the code as necessary. While this work has continued, and the Planning and Zoning Committee has been a valuable part of the Village’s advisory boards, the document of 2002 also recommends updating the comprehensive plan every twenty years. 
 
We strongly support the updating of the Comprehensive Plan and agree that this year, twenty years later as recommended by the original committee, is the right time to once again gather a group of stakeholders together to carefully and thoughtfully update the Comprehensive Plan for our present day. 

 

Photo by Richard Lewin

 


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